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New Water Pipelines

CENTRAL TABLELANDS REGIONAL WATER SECURITY PROJECTS :

The region’s network of water pipelines is being expanded to improve water access and water security.

Orange City Council, Central Tablelands Water (CTW) and Cabonne Council have received funding under the NSW Government’s Restart NSW Water Security for Regions programme to build two new pipelines.

On this page you can learn more about the projects and what the new pipelines would it will mean for the region’s residents :

  • by reading brief items in the 'News Feed' below
  • by reading more detailed reports in the 'Document Library' (at right)
  • looking at the key-dates on the projects’ time-line
  • and by checking FAQs (at right)


CENTRAL TABLELANDS REGIONAL WATER SECURITY PROJECTS :

The region’s network of water pipelines is being expanded to improve water access and water security.

Orange City Council, Central Tablelands Water (CTW) and Cabonne Council have received funding under the NSW Government’s Restart NSW Water Security for Regions programme to build two new pipelines.

On this page you can learn more about the projects and what the new pipelines would it will mean for the region’s residents :

  • by reading brief items in the 'News Feed' below
  • by reading more detailed reports in the 'Document Library' (at right)
  • looking at the key-dates on the projects’ time-line
  • and by checking FAQs (at right)


  • Last sections of pipeline in the ground

    7 months ago
    Pipeline 1

    October 20, 2017

    The last sections of the 61-kilometre Orange to Carcoar water pipeline have been installed.

    Crews from contractor, Leed Engineering & Construction, have been working in a number of locations throughout the project which began in March this year.

    While the pipeline stage is now complete, work is continuing on other elements of the project.

    A number of pumping stations are still being built along the route. Chlorine-dosing equipment is also being installed.

    The construction phase of the project is expected to be completed by the end of 2017, with commissioning to continue into the new year.

    Bathurst...

    October 20, 2017

    The last sections of the 61-kilometre Orange to Carcoar water pipeline have been installed.

    Crews from contractor, Leed Engineering & Construction, have been working in a number of locations throughout the project which began in March this year.

    While the pipeline stage is now complete, work is continuing on other elements of the project.

    A number of pumping stations are still being built along the route. Chlorine-dosing equipment is also being installed.

    The construction phase of the project is expected to be completed by the end of 2017, with commissioning to continue into the new year.

    Bathurst MP Paul Toole said the government was proud to be contributing $21.21 million towards the new potable water pipeline from Orange to Blayney and Carcoar.

    "The NSW Government is determined to provide communities across the state with a clean and reliable supply of drinking water," Mr Toole said.

    "It's clear this pipeline will be hugely beneficial to the entire region's water security."

    Late last year, Leed Engineering & Construction was awarded the contract to design and construct the pipeline. The majority of the pipeline has been installed in road corridors, with only small sections on private land.

    The project received $21.21 million in funding from the NSW Government’s Restart NSW Water Security for Regions program, set up to improve water security and help communities prepare for further drought conditions.

    The total estimated cost of the new pipeline project is $28.7 million. This is funded by:

    · NSW State Government - $21.21m

    · Orange City Council - $5m

    · CTW - $2.5m

    Orange Mayor Reg Kidd said the new link between Blayney and Orange will be a major boost to local water instrastructure.

    “What’s being built is a two-way pipeline which will allow water to be transferred to either centre’s water supply network if and when there is an emergency water issue at either water filtration plant,” Reg Kidd said.

    “It’s a tremendous example of partnership between the NSW Government, Orange City Council and Central Tablelands Water to deliver the long term infrastructure the region needs.”

    Central Tablelands Water (CTW ) Chairman David Somervaille said he was delighted with the progress on building the pipeline.

    “The new pipeline from Carcoar to Millthorpe will replace the existing pipeline used to supply water to Millthorpe,” Mr Somervaille said.

    “This pipeline was due to be replaced in 11 years’ time and that would have cost CTW an estimated $13 million. Because of this funding partnership, CTW is getting around $15 million worth of new water infrastructure for its contribution of only $2.5m.

    “We’re always planning for the future and this project has let CTW bring forward its capital works program by 10 to 12 years by replacing the water trunk mains between Millthorpe, Blayney and Carcoar. This level of new infrastructure will be used every day to continue to provide a quality water supply to our consumers."


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  • Pipeline delivers infrastructure boost for Blayney Shire area

    9 months ago
    Blayney border flow meter 800

    The water pipeline that’s currently being built through the Blayney Shire area is giving a major boost to local infrastructure.

    Central Tablelands Water (CTW ) Chairman David Somervaille said the recent progress on building the pipeline is prompting local residents to ask questions about how the funding is being shared and what it will mean for the future of water use in the Blayney Shire area.

    Mr Somervaille said the partnership between the NSW Government and local authorities was a fantastic opportunity to replacing ageing infrastructure.

    “The new pipeline from Carcoar to Millthorpe will replace the existing pipeline used to...


    The water pipeline that’s currently being built through the Blayney Shire area is giving a major boost to local infrastructure.

    Central Tablelands Water (CTW ) Chairman David Somervaille said the recent progress on building the pipeline is prompting local residents to ask questions about how the funding is being shared and what it will mean for the future of water use in the Blayney Shire area.

    Mr Somervaille said the partnership between the NSW Government and local authorities was a fantastic opportunity to replacing ageing infrastructure.

    “The new pipeline from Carcoar to Millthorpe will replace the existing pipeline used to supply water to Millthorpe,” Mr Somervaille said.

    “This pipeline was due to be replaced in 11 years’ time and that would have cost CTW an estimated $13 million. Because of this funding partnership, CTW is getting around $15 million worth of new water infrastructure for its contribution of only $2.5m.

    “We’re always planning for the future and this project has let CTW bring forward its capital works program by 10 to 12 years by replacing the water trunk mains between Millthorpe, Blayney and Carcoar. This level of new infrastructure will be used every day to continue to provide a quality water supply to our consumers.

    “This Project means Central Tablelands Water can operate the water supply network from Millthorpe, Blayney and Carcoar more efficiently and effectively. Water security for the community will be increased.”

    CTW General Manager Gavin Rhodes said the new link between Blayney and Orange had also prompted discussion about the sharing of water between local communities.

    “What’s being built is a two-way pipeline which will allow water to be transferred to either water supply network if and when there is an emergency water issue at either water filtration plant,” Mr Rhodes said.

    “The community of Orange will only be supplied water from CTW’s supply network during an emergency
    water situation, for example, if there’s a breakdown or malfunction at the Water Filtration Plant in Orange.

    There will be a formal Bulk Water Supply Agreement in place, that means that CTW will transfer water to
    Orange City Council at an agreed price, and vice versa.

    “The same principle applies in reverse. The pipeline will also deliver extra water if there’s a breakdown or failure of CTW’s raw water pipelines or power outages.

    “I’ve also heard that people are wondering if local water restrictions will change.

    “The objective of CTW’s Water Restrictions policy is to manage demand during periods of water scarcity to ensure all customers have access to a secure water supply.

    Water restrictions for CTW customers will only be activated in line with CTW’s Water Restrictions Policy, irrespective of Orange being on water restrictions.

    “The CTW supply network and the Orange City Council water supply network will remain as separate,
    independent networks.”

    The total estimated cost of the new pipeline project is $28.7 million.

    This is funded by:
    • NSW State Government - $21.21m
    • Orange City Council - $5m
    • CTW - $2.5m
    The project is expected to be completed by the end of 2017.

    Late last year, Leed Engineering & Construction was awarded the contract to design and construct the
    pipeline. The majority of the pipeline is being built in road corridors, with only small sections on private
    land.

    The project received $21.21 million in funding from the NSW Government’s Restart NSW Water Security
    for Regions program, set up to improve water security and help communities prepare for further drought
    conditions.


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  • New pipeline project making progress, reaches Blayney Shire boundary

    10 months ago
    Blayney boundary sign 300


    19 July 2017

    The project of building the Orange to Carcoar water security pipeline is making good progress with the beginning of pipe-laying in Blayney Shire.

    Since work began in April this year, around 18 kilometres of pipeline has been laid in the Orange area.

    Work is progressing along Millthorpe Road between Williams Lane towards the village of Millthorpe and work crews have now crossed the council boundary into Blayney Shire.

    Central Tablelands Water General Manager Gavin Rhodes said he was pleased with the signs of progress.

    “The dry weather of recent months is not good for our farmers, but...


    19 July 2017

    The project of building the Orange to Carcoar water security pipeline is making good progress with the beginning of pipe-laying in Blayney Shire.

    Since work began in April this year, around 18 kilometres of pipeline has been laid in the Orange area.

    Work is progressing along Millthorpe Road between Williams Lane towards the village of Millthorpe and work crews have now crossed the council boundary into Blayney Shire.

    Central Tablelands Water General Manager Gavin Rhodes said he was pleased with the signs of progress.

    “The dry weather of recent months is not good for our farmers, but it’s ideal weather for putting pipeline in the ground,” Gavin Rhodes said.

    “Most of the pipeline route is running alongside local roads and locals have noticed the route survey pegs along the roads around the Blayney Shire. We’ve been very much looking forward to the arrival of the work crews.”

    “It varies from site to site depending on what’s under the ground, but the Leed Engineering & Construction crews can lay between 100 and 500 metres of pipe a day. They’ll be working from Millthorpe towards Blayney and Carcoar in the coming months.”

    BOUNDARY : Pipe-laying work crews have reached the boundary of Blayney Shire Council.

    Orange mayor John Davis OAM said Orange City Council was pleased to work in partnership with Central Tablelands Water.

    “This is going to be an important piece of long term infrastructure for the central west, and it’s great we’re working together to get on with the job,” Cr John Davis said.

    These works are being largely funded by a $21.21 million investment from the NSW Government through the Restart NSW Water Security for Regions program.

    The pipeline includes a number of new pump stations which moves the water through the pipeline. Work is also under way on a new pump station near the Spring Creek dam, near Orange.

    The project is expected to be completed by the end of the year.

    BACKGROUND INFORMATION

    The 61-kilometre water pipeline is being constructed from Orange to Carcoar.

    Work is happening in a number of different locations along the pipeline route, which stretches from Orange, through Spring Hill, Millthorpe, Blayney and Carcoar.

    Late last year, Leed Engineering & Construction was awarded the contract to design and construct the pipeline, that’s designed to improve water access and security in areas serviced by Orange City Council and Central Tablelands Water.

    The majority of the pipeline is being built in road corridors, with only small sections on private land.

    The project received $21.21 million in funding from the NSW Government’s Restart NSW Water Security for Regions program, set up to improve water security and help communities prepare for further drought conditions.

    EQUIPMENT : A large flow meter has been installed at the location on the pipeline where water from Blayney Shire area would meet water from the Orange City Council area. The meter is designed to measure how much water flows in either direction.

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  • Construction begins on vital water pipeline

    about 1 year ago
    Pipes

    Work on the Orange to Blayney to Carcoar Water Security Pipeline Project is well underway within streets in Orange.

    Lone Pine Avenue, Wakeford Street and Dairy Creek Road have had sections along the road side ripped up while the 61- kilometre pipeline is laid.

    Deputy Premier and Minister for Regional NSW, John Barilaro, said long-term water security is vital to the needs of regional communities and underpins confidence for continued investment and growth in these areas.

    “It is exciting to see construction begin on the Orange to Blayney and Carcoar Water Security Pipeline Project which will improve water security across...

    Work on the Orange to Blayney to Carcoar Water Security Pipeline Project is well underway within streets in Orange.

    Lone Pine Avenue, Wakeford Street and Dairy Creek Road have had sections along the road side ripped up while the 61- kilometre pipeline is laid.

    Deputy Premier and Minister for Regional NSW, John Barilaro, said long-term water security is vital to the needs of regional communities and underpins confidence for continued investment and growth in these areas.

    “It is exciting to see construction begin on the Orange to Blayney and Carcoar Water Security Pipeline Project which will improve water security across a large area of central-west NSW,” Mr Barilaro said.

    “I’m proud the NSW Government has been able to contribute $21.21 million to this important project through the $325 million Restart NSW Water Security for Regions program.”

    The project involves the construction of a 61-kilometre water pipeline from Orange to Carcoar, via Spring Hill, Millthorpe and Blayney. It is expected to take 12 months to complete and will improve water access and security in areas serviced by Orange City Council and Central Tablelands Water.

    Minister for Regional Water, Niall Blair, said the NSW Government is committed to helping communities across the state prepare for drought conditions and to ensuring regional towns have the infrastructure they need to support economic growth.

    “In regional areas, water means vibrant communities and jobs. Through the NSW Government’s Water Security for Regions program, we have augmented dams, constructed pipelines and bores and contributed to a range of water efficiency projects across the state, and we are so pleased of the positive impact that these initiatives are having on local communities,” Mr Blair said.

    Member for Bathurst, Paul Toole, said most of the two-way, underground pipeline is to be installed within road corridors to minimise impacts on the environment.

    “The pipeline construction process will look much like a moving assembly line with, typically, 200 metres to 400 metres of pipeline laid each day. It is great to see the cooperation between Orange City Council and Central Tablelands Water in the management of this project which will allow both organisations to share water resources. “Mr Toole said.

    For maps and details of the pipeline project head to our dedicated pipeline webpage.


    PIPES: Contractors complete about 80 metres of pipeline a day.

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  • Work begins on the Orange to Carcoar pipeline

    about 1 year ago
    Sod pipeline


    Work has begun on the 61-kilometre water pipeline from Orange to Carcoar and a symbolic sod turning was held in Millthorpe today.

    Throughout the project work will take place progressively in a number of different locations along the pipeline route, which stretches from Orange, through Spring Hill, Millthorpe, Blayney and Carcoar.

    Orange Mayor John Davis said the project, which is being jointly funded by Orange City Council, NSW Government and Central Tableands Water, was a great example of what can be achieved when organisations work together.

    "The first stages of work are happening with two crews working in two locations...


    Work has begun on the 61-kilometre water pipeline from Orange to Carcoar and a symbolic sod turning was held in Millthorpe today.

    Throughout the project work will take place progressively in a number of different locations along the pipeline route, which stretches from Orange, through Spring Hill, Millthorpe, Blayney and Carcoar.

    Orange Mayor John Davis said the project, which is being jointly funded by Orange City Council, NSW Government and Central Tableands Water, was a great example of what can be achieved when organisations work together.

    "The first stages of work are happening with two crews working in two locations around Orange," Cr Davis said.

    "In May crews are expected to start work on sections of the project closer to Blayney.

    "This project is another example of local and state government agencies working together to boost the water security of the region.

    T"he building of this significant piece of infrastructure also delivers a major shot in the arm for the local economy, and provides terrific value for money for taxpayers."

    Late last year, Leed Engineering & Construction was awarded the $23.5 million contract to design and construct the pipeline, that’s designed to improve water access and security in areas serviced by Orange City Council and Central Tablelands Water.

    The project received $21.21 million in funding from the NSW Government’s Restart NSW Water Security for Regions program, set up to improve water security and help communities prepare for further drought conditions. Orange City Council is contributing $5 million to the project and Central Tablelands Water $2.5 million.

    Steel pipes, measuring 300-375 mm diameter are being placed in underground trenches, between 1 to 2 metres deep. The majority of the pipeline will be built in road corridors, with only small sections on private land.

    "The project is expected to be completed by the end of 2017."

    IT'S OFFICIAL: The first sod was turned in Millthorpe to mark the start of the Orange to Carcoar pipeline construction.

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  • Pipeline construction set to begin

    over 1 year ago
    Pipeline lift  2

    The construction tender for the 61-kilometre potable water pipeline from Orange to Carcoar has been awarded, with works set to begin in early 2017.

    Orange City Council awarded Leed Engineering & Construction the $23.5 million contract to design and construct the pipeline, that’s designed to improve water access and security in areas serviced by Council and Central Tablelands Water.

    Orange Mayor John Davis OAM, is delighted by the tender price which will see both stages of the project covered by the available funding.

    “This project is another example of local and state government agencies working together for the benefit and...


    The construction tender for the 61-kilometre potable water pipeline from Orange to Carcoar has been awarded, with works set to begin in early 2017.

    Orange City Council awarded Leed Engineering & Construction the $23.5 million contract to design and construct the pipeline, that’s designed to improve water access and security in areas serviced by Council and Central Tablelands Water.

    Orange Mayor John Davis OAM, is delighted by the tender price which will see both stages of the project covered by the available funding.

    “This project is another example of local and state government agencies working together for the benefit and security of the region,” Cr Davis said.

    “The building of this significant piece of infrastructure also delivers a major shot in the arm for the local economy, and provides terrific value for money for taxpayers.”

    Orange City Council selected Leed Engineering & Construction from a short list of seven construction companies nominated in June this year.

    “Leed has extensive experience in the field and has built a number of pipelines throughout Australia, including the Macquarie to Orange Pipeline.”

    The engineering design of the pipeline itself is expected to begin immediately, with construction to commence in early 2017. The project is expected to be completed by the end of 2017.

    The conceptual design and route of the two-way underground pipeline from Orange to Carcoar, via Spring Hill, Millthorpe and Blayney, has already been finalised. It is proposed the majority of the pipeline would be built in road corridors, with only small sections on private land.

    The project received $21.21 million in funding from the NSW Government’s Restart NSW Water Security for Regions program, set up to improve water security and help communities prepare for further drought conditions.

    The funds originally covered the first stage of the pipeline project, stretching from Orange to Blayney. However, the tender price accepted in this week’s council meeting means that both stages of the project can now be completed within the NSW Government’s existing grant.

    As a result of this significant saving, Central Tablelands Water is now planning to upgrade two water treatment plants at Blayney and Carcoar in order to realise the full potential of the expansion, and will be seeking additional funding accordingly.

    General Manager of Central Tablelands Water (CTW), Gavin Rhodes, said he was delighted that the full length of the pipeline could be completed using available funds.

    “The Blayney to Carcoar pipeline is crucial to delivering the full benefits of the overarching project,” Mr Rhodes said.

    “It is fantastic news that the contract awarded last night covers design and construction of the entire pipeline.

    “In order to get the best result for the people of the region, we’ll be seeking funding for a number of key upgrades to the two treatment plants.”

    CONSTRUCTION: Leed Engineering and Construction laying the pipeline for the Macquarie Pipeline.

    For more information about the project, visit http://yoursay.orange.nsw.gov.au/pipelines

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  • Pipeline project reaches next milestone as project goes to tender

    almost 2 years ago
    Carcoar  tender cu

    The project to build a 61-kilometre potable water pipeline from Orange to Carcoar has reached a new milestone with the project going out to tender for construction work this week.

    The tender documents have been sent to seven construction companies which were short-listed after a selection process in June.

    Orange City Council’s technical Services Director Chris Devitt said the pre-selection process gives potential contractors more time to prepare for the project.

    “The credentials and experience of each of the seven companies has been assessed,” Mr Devitt said.

    “The pre-selection short-list results in tenderers who are more...

    The project to build a 61-kilometre potable water pipeline from Orange to Carcoar has reached a new milestone with the project going out to tender for construction work this week.

    The tender documents have been sent to seven construction companies which were short-listed after a selection process in June.

    Orange City Council’s technical Services Director Chris Devitt said the pre-selection process gives potential contractors more time to prepare for the project.

    “The credentials and experience of each of the seven companies has been assessed,” Mr Devitt said.

    “The pre-selection short-list results in tenderers who are more familiar with the project and will be better prepared to put in a well-planned tender.”

    The tender documents include a concept design of the two-way underground pipeline and a detailed route for the pipeline from Orange to Carcoar, via Spring Hill, Millthorpe and Blayney.

    It is proposed that most of the pipeline would be built in road corridors, with only small sections in private agricultural land.

    Stage 1 of the project, from Orange to Blayney, received $21.21 million in funding from the NSW Government’s Restart NSW Water Security for Regions program, and is being delivered by Orange City Council and Central Tablelands Water (CTW).

    Central Tablelands Water is currently applying for funding of Stage 2 of the project, for the section between Blayney and Carcoar.

    It’s expected that the tenders from construction companies would be considered in November and the timetable for the project expects work to begin early in the new year.

    General Manager of Central Tablelands Water (CTW), Gavin Rhodes said that he was thrilled to see the progress of the tendering process.

    “While we were very happy that construction of the first stage would begin in early 2017, CTW are also looking ahead to progressing the Stage 2 works which is currently unfunded, but considered crucial to delivering the full benefits of the overarching project,” Mr Rhodes said.


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  • Council backs new pipeline

    almost 2 years ago
    Ref trees 700

    Orange City Council has endorsed the latest milestone towards building the proposed new $27.6 million Orange to Carcoar water pipeline.

    Last night’s (7 June) council meeting considered the 134-page Review of Environmental Factors (REF) report by environment consultants Geolyse which was on public exhibition earlier this year for community comment. This independent environmental assessment found the pipeline “is unlikely to result in a significant adverse environmental impact.”

    There were thirteen submissions received during the exhibition period which were examined in a report to last night’s meeting.

    The community submissions raised a number of issues including potential impacts of the pipeline...

    Orange City Council has endorsed the latest milestone towards building the proposed new $27.6 million Orange to Carcoar water pipeline.

    Last night’s (7 June) council meeting considered the 134-page Review of Environmental Factors (REF) report by environment consultants Geolyse which was on public exhibition earlier this year for community comment. This independent environmental assessment found the pipeline “is unlikely to result in a significant adverse environmental impact.”

    There were thirteen submissions received during the exhibition period which were examined in a report to last night’s meeting.

    The community submissions raised a number of issues including potential impacts of the pipeline on:

    • groundwater
    • swampy meadows along the pipeline route
    • the capacity of existing water supplies
    • the terrestrial environment.

    The REF found that the potential for adverse impacts was primarily restricted to the construction phase.

    The council meeting also endorsed the proposed review of sections of the pipeline to avoid potential impacts on swampy meadows.

    Orange City Council Mayor John Davis said the step of putting the Environmental Review up for community comment will result in a better project.

    “It’s important to listen to the views and insights of the community. Because of the thoughtful comments that have come in, the engineers will having a close look at the proposed pipeline route to minimise environmental impacts,” Cr John Davis said.

    The proposed project is a 61-kilometre, two-way underground pipeline to carry potable water between Orange and Carcoar, via Spring Hill, Millthorpe and Blayney. It is proposed that most of the pipeline would be built in road corridors, with only small sections in private agricultural land.

    The project has received $21.21 million in funding from the NSW Government’s Restart NSW Water Security for Regions program, and is being delivered by Orange City Council and Central Tablelands Water.


  • Pipeline project review up for comment

    about 2 years ago
    Ref trees 300

    An independent environmental assessment of the planned Orange to Carcoar water pipeline has found the pipeline “is unlikely to result in a significant adverse environmental impact.”

    The 134-page review by environment consultants Geolyse was on public exhibition for 30 days for community comment. The deadline for comment was Tuesday 26 April.

    The proposed project is a 57 kilometre 2-way underground pipeline to carry drinking-water between Orange and Carcoar, via Spring Hill, Millthorpe and Blayney. It is proposed that most of the pipeline would be built in road corridors, with only small sections in private agricultural land.

    The project is being...

    An independent environmental assessment of the planned Orange to Carcoar water pipeline has found the pipeline “is unlikely to result in a significant adverse environmental impact.”

    The 134-page review by environment consultants Geolyse was on public exhibition for 30 days for community comment. The deadline for comment was Tuesday 26 April.

    The proposed project is a 57 kilometre 2-way underground pipeline to carry drinking-water between Orange and Carcoar, via Spring Hill, Millthorpe and Blayney. It is proposed that most of the pipeline would be built in road corridors, with only small sections in private agricultural land.

    The project is being overseen by Orange City Council and Central Tablelands Water with funding worth $21.2 million from the NSW Government’s Restart NSW Water Security for Regions program.

    According to the Review of Environmental Factors (REF), the pipeline can be built “without degrading the health, diversity and productivity of the environment for future generations and without jeopardising biological diversity or ecological integrity.” The review finds the project “does not require any change to existing water access licenses”.

    The deadline for community comments is Tuesday 26 April, 2016.

    The Orange to Carcoar project is one element of the larger ‘Central Tablelands Regional Water Security Pipeline Project’ that will see a pipeline built by Cabonne Council from Orange to Molong Dam, to supply drinking water to the villages of Yeoval and Cumnock.

    The review finds the potential for adverse environment impact is primarily restricted to the pipeline’s construction phase.

    The proposed pipeline route would cross nineteen watercourses and work would happen in heritage conservation areas, as well in or near endangered ecological communities.

    The review recommends measures to prevent potential heritage impact and finds that the construction work won’t result in potential pollution if erosion and sediment control practices are used and remediation measures are implemented progressively.

    The review (REF) document is available in two parts.

    Review of Environmental Factors Part 1

    Review of Environmental Factors Part 2

    A hard copy of the REF is available for inspection at the Orange Civic Centre, corner of Byng Street and Lords Place, Orange.

    Submissions from the public are welcome and the exhibition period is for 30 Days concluding at 5pm on Tuesday, 26 April 2016.

    Written comments on the REF can be :

    • emailed to council@orange.nsw.gov.au or
    • mailed to PO Box 35 Orange NSW 2800 or
    • hand delivered to the Orange Civic Centre, corner of Byng Street and Lords Place Orange.
    DEADLINE for submissions : 5pm, Tuesday, 26 April 2016.



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  • Work begins to find route for pipeline

    over 2 years ago
    Ref trees 700


    WATER WORKS : The Orange Water Treatment Plant, which is set to become a key component of an expanded system of pipelines, was the backdrop for a media launch of the new pipelines project.

    The first stage of work to prepare for building a new water pipeline from Orange to Carcoar is under way.

    The preliminary work to determine the route for the underground pipeline has begun and this week more than 100 landholders along the potential path have received letters, keeping them in touch with the project’s early progress.

    The latest progress on the project, including...


    WATER WORKS : The Orange Water Treatment Plant, which is set to become a key component of an expanded system of pipelines, was the backdrop for a media launch of the new pipelines project.

    The first stage of work to prepare for building a new water pipeline from Orange to Carcoar is under way.

    The preliminary work to determine the route for the underground pipeline has begun and this week more than 100 landholders along the potential path have received letters, keeping them in touch with the project’s early progress.

    The latest progress on the project, including a new information website, was unveiled at the Orange Water Treatment Plant Friday 6 November.

    Member for Orange Andrew Gee said the NSW Government allocated $37.8 million in funding earlier this year for two new major water projects in the Central West through its Restart NSW Water Security for the Regions Program.

    “Water security is one of the great challenges facing regional Australia. If our communities can’t source water, they can’t grow. These pipelines revolutionise water management in the Central West. It’s a true game changer,” Mr Gee said.

    The two projects comprise:

    • $16.7 million for Orange City Council and Cabonne Council to construct a 65 kilometre water pipeline from Orange to Molong Dam, and from Molong to Cumnock and Yeoval which is being overseen by Cabonne Council; and
    • $21.2 million for Orange City Council and Central Tablelands Water for a 57 kilometre potable water pipeline from Orange to Carcoar via Spring Hill, Millthorpe and Blayney.

    Route selection work has begun on the Orange City Council and Central Tablelands Water project, which also includes plans to build pump stations to handle 2-way flows between Orange and the Central Tablelands water network.

    Preliminary route assessment so far indicates most of the pipeline will be able to be built in road reserves. A small proportion of the route may be built on privately owned land.

    Central Tablelands Water General Manager Gavin Rhodes said the pipeline is good news for the region’s residents.

    “The project will further strengthen water security for the customers of Central Tablelands Water,” Mr Rhodes said.

    Orange Mayor John Davis has welcomed the start of work as a step towards better water security for the region.

    “Orange City Council will gain access to emergency water in the case of a catastrophic system failure such as a fire at the water filtration plant and also be able to ensure water quantity and quality to the airport, Spring Hill and Lucknow.

    “The same benefits will apply for the 12,000 customers of the Central Tablelands Water system.”


    MAP : Pictured looking at preliminary route plans for the new pipeline are (l. to r.) Central Tablelands Water Operations Manager Darrell Sligar, Member for Orange Andrew Gee, Central Tablelands Water General Manager Gavin Rhodes and Orange Mayor John Davis.


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