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Orange City Council News

Orange City Council News

  • Family Day out at Wentworth Main Mine

    3 days ago
    Historic mine pic

    Orange families will have the chance to step back in time this weekend by enjoying an outdoor picnic from the Victorian age.

    Orange Regional Museum is organizing a picnic at the Wentworth Mine suite at Lucknow, from 11am to 3pm, with food, games and entertainment from the Victorian age.

    Orange mayor John Davis OAM, said the picnic is being organised in the style of an event held in the nineteenth century.

    “In 1887 the Mine Manager, Henry Newman, hosted a picnic for the workers at the Reform and Wentworth Mines in the village of Lucknow,” Cr John Davis said.

    “The... Continue reading


    Orange families will have the chance to step back in time this weekend by enjoying an outdoor picnic from the Victorian age.

    Orange Regional Museum is organizing a picnic at the Wentworth Mine suite at Lucknow, from 11am to 3pm, with food, games and entertainment from the Victorian age.

    Orange mayor John Davis OAM, said the picnic is being organised in the style of an event held in the nineteenth century.

    “In 1887 the Mine Manager, Henry Newman, hosted a picnic for the workers at the Reform and Wentworth Mines in the village of Lucknow,” Cr John Davis said.

    “The picnic was reported in the local news as a day of ‘thorough enjoyment’ for all the townspeople.”

    “At a time when the working life of a miner would’ve been pretty grim, here was a picnic that was all about fun and games and some music. They even built a botanical arbour as a backdrop. I’m sure this weekend’s event will be just as much fun.”

    The event, on Sunday 30th April, 2017, will feature local music provided by the Orange Regional Conservatorium and bush band Scallywag.

    There will be sweets and treats including lemon and jam tarts, sugar glazed buns and fruit cake and lots of 19th century games for families to enjoy.

    Kids can make their own old fashioned lemonade and the whole family can learn how to play dominos, skittles and croquet.

    Meet costumed gold miners and gentry from the Lachlan Living History group and join-in decorating the botanical arbour. Bring along a branch to help create it.

    Families are encouraged to bring their own picnic rug, food hamper and enjoy the day out.

    Free entry for children, seniors and concession, $2 entry for adults. All sweets and activities on the day provided free of charge.

    Entry to Wentworth Main Mine requires a moderate fitness level, and visitors requiring wheelchair access are advised to contact Orange Regional Museum.

    This event is funded through the Villages of the Heart project in conjunction with Orange Regional Museum, Sydney Living Museums and Arts NSW.

    Bookings for this event are essential, www.orangemuseum.com.au/wentworthpicnic to book your tickets.

    MINING: Orange Mayor John Davis with an anvil at Wentworth Main Mine.

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  • Statue unveiled to remember courage of Orange’s 2nd VC winner

    6 days ago
    John hamilton 3


    Community leaders have gathered to remember the bravery and dedication of Victoria Cross (VC) winner, John Hamilton, with the unveiling of a statue outside Orange’s former Town Hall.

    Orange mayor John Davis OAM is delighted the statue could be put in place in time for this year’s Anzac Day commemorations.

    “The campaign to recognize the connections Hamilton had with Orange gained momentum during recent preparations for the World War I centenary commemorations. It’s obvious we should recognize that Orange had a second soldier who was awarded the VC,” Cr John Davis said. “The bravery of Sir Neville Howse has been... Continue reading


    Community leaders have gathered to remember the bravery and dedication of Victoria Cross (VC) winner, John Hamilton, with the unveiling of a statue outside Orange’s former Town Hall.

    Orange mayor John Davis OAM is delighted the statue could be put in place in time for this year’s Anzac Day commemorations.

    “The campaign to recognize the connections Hamilton had with Orange gained momentum during recent preparations for the World War I centenary commemorations. It’s obvious we should recognize that Orange had a second soldier who was awarded the VC,” Cr John Davis said. “The bravery of Sir Neville Howse has been acknowledged for many years, but when it was discovered that John Hamilton was born in Orange, there was strong community support for another memorial to be built.”

    The life-size bronze statue was cast in Victoria by Everlon Bronze and funded by :

    • Orange City Council $25,000
    • NSW Government $25,000
    • Orange Ex-Services Club $25,000

    “I congratulate all those who had a hand in garnering support for this project, and I’m delighted that when ex-servicemen and women gather here in front of the Town Hall to march on Anzac Day each year, the statue of John Hamilton and the stories of his courage will be here to inspire them, and see them off on their way,” Cr John Davis said.

    “This site outside the old Town Hall was historically a place for Orange residents to gather, and it’s an ideal location for a statue with a story like this.”


    Representing the NSW Government at the unveiling Hon Katrina Hodgkinson said : “It is a great honour to be here today representing the NSW Government and to be part of a ceremony that honours the actions and story of one man from this city whose courage and daring exemplifies the spirit of the ANZACs.”

    President of the Orange Ex-Services Club, Graham Gentles said the club was pleased to be involved in the project.

    “We’ve already named a re-vamped room at the club after Hamilton, but this statue will be a great addition for the Orange community ,” Graham Gentles said. “In this location I think the significance of this statue will continue to grow. It will mean more and more to Orange residents in future years.”


    PERSONAL INFORMATION ABOUT JOHN HAMILTON :

    John Hamilton was born in Orange on 24 January 1896.

    Enlisting on 15 September 1914, he took part in the original landing at Gallipoli on 25 April 1915.

    At age 19 John took part in the bloody battle of Lone Pine. Of the 883 officers and men of the 3rd Battalion at the time of the assault, only 291 marched out. Early on the morning of 9 August the Turkish troops launched a violent attack. Hamilton was ordered to take up a position on the parapet, behind and above the trench to attack the Turkish troops coming across open ground. His role was as a sniper, protected only by a number of sandbags. He hurled improvised jam-tin bombs at the Turks, as well as picking up enemy bombs and throwing them back before they exploded.

    After a spell in England, when he was presented with a Victoria Cross by King George V at Buckingham Palace, Hamilton went back to the front in France with his unit, and fought at Pozieres, Mouquet Farm and Flers during the Somme offensive.

    John Hamilton settled at Tempe in Sydney, and worked as a docker, shipping clerk, storeman and packer. He was an active member of the Waterside Workers’ Federation.

    During the Second World War John Hamilton returned to active service as a lieutenant on 3 June 1940 and served with the 16th Garrison Battalion until September 1942. He served overseas with the 3rd Pioneer Battalion in New Guinea. In 1944 he joined the Army Labour Service, and was promoted to Captain on 21 October. With his unit he supported the Australian forces who landed on Bougainville in July 1945. His second period of war service was terminated on 19 August 1946.

    John Patrick Hamilton, a son of Orange, died of cerebro-vascular disease in the Repatriation General Hospital, Concord, Sydney on 27 February 1961, leaving his widow Myrtle and a married son Alwyn.

    SEE MORE AT : http://www.centenaryww1orange.com.au/places/gallipoli/john-patrick-hamilton-vc/

    The bronze statue was installed days before the public unveiling.




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  • Museum is on the hunt for items in its new exhibition

    8 days ago
    Img 1525

    The Orange Regional Museum is calling on the community to search through cupboards, sheds, family heirlooms and albums for items to contribute to its new exhibition.

    The exhibition Paddock to Plate, expected to be open in FOOD Week 2018, will focus on the rich history of food growing in the region and how it shaped the area’s culture, economy and has led to the region’s strong reputation as a food and wine hub.


    Orange City Council’s Services Policy Committee Chair Ron Gander said, unlike many other museums, the Orange museum would continue to develop and change its displays.

    “The current... Continue reading


    The Orange Regional Museum is calling on the community to search through cupboards, sheds, family heirlooms and albums for items to contribute to its new exhibition.

    The exhibition Paddock to Plate, expected to be open in FOOD Week 2018, will focus on the rich history of food growing in the region and how it shaped the area’s culture, economy and has led to the region’s strong reputation as a food and wine hub.


    Orange City Council’s Services Policy Committee Chair Ron Gander said, unlike many other museums, the Orange museum would continue to develop and change its displays.

    “The current exhibition Journeys: People, Place, Stories has been received well with hundreds of visitors every week but we’re certainly excited to announce the name of the new exhibition expected in April 2018,” Cr Gander said.

    “People know Orange has a rich history of food and wine but do people know the individual stories of the characters that helped shape our region and its food history?

    “Like the story of the first commercial fruit grower in Orange, George Hawke, who travelled back to Cornwall in search of root stock to grow here but they all died. Instead he planted a variety of fruit trees including apples, cherries, plums and peaches from elsewhere in Australia, and as they say- the rest is history.”

    The educational workshops being run with school children to coincide with Journeys will continue within the new exhibition with programs already being designed.

    “It’s in its early stages but we’re hoping to have cordial making workshops and children can learn to cook using 19th century ingredients and methods,” Cr Gander said.

    A series of casting calls for museum objects and stories will be held over the coming 12 months.

    Staff are looking for objects that are local and are connected in some way to food growing or production in the Orange region.

    “So if you have anything hidden in your home related to a great story about food in the local region then give the team at the museum a call and put it on display, let other people enjoy it as much as you do” Cr Gander said.

    Paddock to Plate isn’t the only change to look forward to at the Orange Regional Museum as Journeys gets a re-vamp in Mid-May.

    “This museum will be ever changing to encourage people to come back time and again,” Cr Gander said.

    “Ahead of the major change in 2018, we’ll be installing a new exhibit where the Electrolux exhibit is currently.

    “The new exhibit will focus on early Chinese migration in the Orange region.

    “It’s another reason people have to come back to the museum.”

    Further information on the exhibition can be obtained by contacting the Orange Regional Museum on 6393 8444 or email museum@orange.nsw.gov.au

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  • Baits take the sting out of wasps at Lake Canobolas

    15 days ago
    Wasp trap 1


    A wet winter last year has contributed to a reduction in the number of European wasps about the city however Orange City Council staff are urging the community to report nests in recreational areas to further reduce the population.

    In previous years places like Lake Canobolas have been swarmed with the insects and while the numbers are reduced, staff are taking measures to ensure the area can be enjoyed by all.

    Orange City Council’s Environmental Sustainability Committee Chair Cr Neil Jones said council’s parks and gardens staff are using environmentally friendly baits to trap and dispose of the stinging insects... Continue reading


    A wet winter last year has contributed to a reduction in the number of European wasps about the city however Orange City Council staff are urging the community to report nests in recreational areas to further reduce the population.

    In previous years places like Lake Canobolas have been swarmed with the insects and while the numbers are reduced, staff are taking measures to ensure the area can be enjoyed by all.

    Orange City Council’s Environmental Sustainability Committee Chair Cr Neil Jones said council’s parks and gardens staff are using environmentally friendly baits to trap and dispose of the stinging insects but he is calling on residents to report all nest sightings in public spaces.

    “The baits are effective and give staff a good indication on the population numbers but serious reductions only happen when they can find a nest and dispose of it,” Cr Jones said.

    “The nests are greyish in colour but are usually in the ground and the wasps enter through a small hole.”

    European wasps are similar in size and shape to a bee but their abdomens are slightly more cylindrical and they have distinctive yellow and black triangular markings. Unlike bees, wasps can sting multiple times.

    “European wasps tend to build nests in the ground or in sheltered areas and have a tendency to be aggressive if they’re disturbed so it’s important people don’t touch them but instead call the council,” Cr Jones said.

    “But there is plenty you can do at home to reduce the number of wasps about the place. Place all cat and dog food, particularly meat, inside if you can or in the garage. Wasps can travel up to a kilometre in search of food and they can detect meat on the air quickly.

    “Also make sure any fruit that falls from garden fruit trees is not left to rot on the grass because fruit is a great source of protein for wasps.

    “It’s also a good idea to clean up after an outdoor barbecue quickly so the smell of meat can’t travel as far and attract the insects to your home.

    “If you find a nest at your home, it’s best to call a private pest control business to come and dispose of it.”

    If you find a wasp nest on council-owned land please call the council on 63938000.

    Top tips to discourage European wasps:

    • Do not leave fallen fruit or food scraps lying around the yard
    • Avoid leaving uneaten pet food or dog bones outside
    • Make sure rubbish bins have tight fitting lids
    • Keep compost covered at all times
    • Keep swimming pools covered when not in use
    • Cover exposed food at picnics and barbecues
    • Don't drink out of cans or bottles, use clear containers or a straw.

    BAITING: Natural Resources Coordinator Roger Smith places a wasp bait at Lake Canobolas.

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  • Updated contributions plan sets guidelines for funding new projects

    15 days ago
    Digger 300

    The newest version of Orange City Council’s Development Contributions Plan has gone on public display for community comment.

    The latest update is used to guide how much property developers, and through them people who buy land in new subdivisions around Orange, contribute towards new infrastructure projects.

    Orange City Council’s Planning & Development Committee chair Cr Russell Turner believes it’s important that community members understand how proposed major projects , such as a new sports precinct and new road upgrades are funded.

    “When it comes to long-term infrastructure, such as new sporting fields or a major new roundabout on the bypass,... Continue reading


    The newest version of Orange City Council’s Development Contributions Plan has gone on public display for community comment.

    The latest update is used to guide how much property developers, and through them people who buy land in new subdivisions around Orange, contribute towards new infrastructure projects.

    Orange City Council’s Planning & Development Committee chair Cr Russell Turner believes it’s important that community members understand how proposed major projects , such as a new sports precinct and new road upgrades are funded.

    “When it comes to long-term infrastructure, such as new sporting fields or a major new roundabout on the bypass, it’s fair that the families who are buying land to build houses, make a financial contribution,” Cr Russell Turner said. “The Contributions Plan is a complex document, but it’s essentially about working out how much money these new projects are costing and then sharing that total amount between the number of new building blocks.”

    “This amount varies across Orange, from a minimum of about $10,000 per block up to the top limit of $20,000 that’s capped by the NSW Government. Eventually, once new houses are built, residents will make a contribution to the city through the rates they’ll pay, but in the meantime they a contributing a share towards the costs of the roads, parks and stormwater basins.”

    The Contributions Plan also aims to ensure there are enough building sites to meet the future demand.

    “The plan estimates that by 2026, the community of Orange will need at extra 3,437 dwellings compared to where we were in 2009”, Cr Turner said. “On average since the 1990s we’ve been having around 242 new blocks a year so we’re right on track to meet that target.”

    “It’s a balancing act between supply and demand, and there’s been peaks and troughs in recent years. In 2015/16 346 new blocks were created, but from the conversations I’ve had this week with builders and developers there are signs that currently there’s a shortage of new building blocks.”

    “On one hand making a judgement about the demand for new blocks, is up to developers, but by putting this plan on display, the council is putting the information out there for the business community to make its decisions.”

    “It’s important that as community we all own the implications of this contributions plan. People can check out the detail online and then have their say by making a submission. “

    See more and download the document at : www.orange.nsw.gov.au/dcp


    BUILDING BLOCKS : Orange City Council’s Planning & Development Committee chair Cr Russell Turner...,' “It’s important that as community we all own the implications of this contributions plan.'
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  • All aboard for the annual heritage festival

    16 days ago
    Train

    Food, history and art will be celebrated in Orange and the broader region for the upcoming annual Australian Heritage Festival.

    This year’s national festival coincides with the 140th anniversary of the first train rolling into Orange, which pulled up at 4pm, April 19, 1877.

    Orange City Council’s Services Policy Committee Chair Ron Gander said the Orange Regional Museum had joined with the team at the Orange railway station and the Orange Historical Society to mark the occasion.

    “Connecting Orange to the railway network was a significant event which boosted the population and the economy and helped transform the area into... Continue reading


    Food, history and art will be celebrated in Orange and the broader region for the upcoming annual Australian Heritage Festival.

    This year’s national festival coincides with the 140th anniversary of the first train rolling into Orange, which pulled up at 4pm, April 19, 1877.

    Orange City Council’s Services Policy Committee Chair Ron Gander said the Orange Regional Museum had joined with the team at the Orange railway station and the Orange Historical Society to mark the occasion.

    “Connecting Orange to the railway network was a significant event which boosted the population and the economy and helped transform the area into what it is today, so it’s a worthy occasion to celebrate,” Cr Gander said.

    “The Orange and District Historical Society and the local train station are hosting celebrations and a display of historical railway images is being planned for Orange City Library.

    “There will be a free family fun day April 19 at the station with a birthday cake, a jumping castle and a barbecue from 11am, when the Sydney train arrives. No need to book just come along.

    “But this celebration is only a small part of what is a much broader festival across the whole central west.”

    The Molong Museum will make use of its historical kitchen to rediscover the types of food and flavours on offer over one hundred years ago with Sydney Living Museum’s gastronomer, Jacqui Newling.

    The Banjo Paterson Museum at Yeoval is planning tours and Eugowra’s annual Village of Murals will see the town covered in artwork painted by visiting artists.

    Closer to home, Wentworth Main Mine, Lucknow, will step back in time to the 1880s and host a picnic with all the sounds, tastes and games of the Victorian past.

    Regional museums and historical sites will open their doors during the Regional Museums Open Weekend as part of the festival, Friday 28th April – Sunday 30th April, for locals and visitors alike to get to know the fascinating heritage of the central west.

    All events and details of museum opening times can be found in the Australian Heritage Festival program, available from the Orange Visitor Information Centre or online at orangemuseum.com.au/heritagefestival

    ALL ABOARD: A steam train pulls into the Orange railway station last year.

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  • Orange teacher goes the extra mile for local kids

    17 days ago
    Cameron jones head shot

    Cameron Jones has raised thousands of dollars for worthy individuals, spent thousands of hours coaching young Orange sportspeople, is a dedicated teacher and is this month’s Orange City Council Youth of the Month.

    Orange Mayor John Davis said the 22-year-old was an inspiration and he was proud to honour the young man at a presentation ceremony in council chambers.

    “Cameron is truly an impressive young man and it is clear from his dedication to improving the opportunities for young sportspeople in the city that he is a valuable member of our community,” Cr Davis said.

    “He raised thousands of dollars... Continue reading


    Cameron Jones has raised thousands of dollars for worthy individuals, spent thousands of hours coaching young Orange sportspeople, is a dedicated teacher and is this month’s Orange City Council Youth of the Month.

    Orange Mayor John Davis said the 22-year-old was an inspiration and he was proud to honour the young man at a presentation ceremony in council chambers.

    “Cameron is truly an impressive young man and it is clear from his dedication to improving the opportunities for young sportspeople in the city that he is a valuable member of our community,” Cr Davis said.

    “He raised thousands of dollars for a mate who was severely injured in a sporting accident. He raised money for Ronald McDonald House. He is also a distinguished sportsperson.”

    Cameron has volunteered for CYMS Junior Rugby League, CYMS Junior Cricket, spent hours volunteering with schools in Blayney, Orange, Canowindra and Cowra, taught in Samoa and was made a life member of CYMS Junior Rugby League last year.

    He has been a valued sporting coach for CYMS Junior Rugby League and a team member of the CYMS Premier League side for several years.

    “People like Cameron don’t do these activities for the accolades or the acknowledgment. They do it because they genuinely enjoy helping other people and that’s something to be proud of,” Cr Davis said.

    “Orange is full of people like Cameron and it’s important we give them recognition. So if you know a young person like him, why not nominate them for Orange City Council’s Youth of the Month.”

    The Youth of the Month award is designed to highlight good deeds and accomplishments of young people in the City of Orange who sometimes go unnoticed in the community.

    The award is aimed at recognising and celebrating young people who have and are currently making significant contributions, particularly in the areas of education, community work, sport, culture, the arts and the environment.

    To nominate a person for Mayoral Youth of the Month contact Orange City Council’s Youth Development Officer Katrina Hausia at khausia@orange.nsw.gov.au

    YOUTH OF THE MONTH: Mayor John Davis with youth of the month Cameron Jones and Community Engagement Officer Lynda Bowtell.

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  • Hundreds of students were hands on at the museum during term one

    17 days ago
    Catherine mcauley 5

    Hundreds of school-aged children panned for gold, carved “stone” tools out of soap, learned about the region’s volcanic past and discovered the “ancient” ways older generations listened to music during the school term at the Orange Regional Museum.

    More than 570 school children from 19 schools across the region participated in the museum’s school’s education program during the first term of the year.

    Orange City Council’s Services Policy Committee Chair Ron Gander said the participation rate exceeded expectations given the museum opened late last year, past the deadline for most of term one school planning.

    “It’s a great outcome,” Cr... Continue reading


    Hundreds of school-aged children panned for gold, carved “stone” tools out of soap, learned about the region’s volcanic past and discovered the “ancient” ways older generations listened to music during the school term at the Orange Regional Museum.

    More than 570 school children from 19 schools across the region participated in the museum’s school’s education program during the first term of the year.

    Orange City Council’s Services Policy Committee Chair Ron Gander said the participation rate exceeded expectations given the museum opened late last year, past the deadline for most of term one school planning.

    “It’s a great outcome,” Cr Gander said.

    “Most schools have term one activities finalized by early term four so we didn’t expect huge numbers in term one.

    “But to see 19 schools come in, about three classes a week is fantastic.

    “The activities run by the museum’s engagement officer are all hands on and were planned with the input from teachers across the central west and the feedback from teachers has all been really positive.”

    Children have been learning about the history of Mount Canobolas, the discovery of gold and what impact it has had on the region, the difference in cultural traditions of Aboriginal people and European settlers and were hands on with “really old objects used for listening to music such as cassette tapes’, Cr Gander said.

    Orange Regional Museum’s public engagement officer, Jess Dowdell, said many of the year one kids she worked with had never seen a cassette tape and the children guessed it must have been a device used by their grandparents.

    “Handling the tapes and finding out how they worked was great fun for them and they went home to tell their parents about the ‘ancient’ technology. But in all seriousness the workshops have exceeded expectations and we’re already gearing up for term two,” Ms Dowdell said.

    “There are more than 300 students booked in already and we’re hoping to add hundreds more.
    “While it is school holidays at the moment, the museum certainly won’t be quiet with booking for its Rolling Railways school holiday activity open and filling fast.”

    Call the museum on 63698444 to book in for the free holiday workshop.

    More information on education programs offered at Orange Regional Museum can be found at orangemuseum.com.au/learn

    STONE MAKING Students from Catherine McAuley Catholic Primary School participating in one of the museum's many education workshops
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  • Councils gives go-ahead to new Quest apartments

    21 days ago
    Quest c u


    Orange City Council has approved plans to build a new accommodation building in Kite Street with potential for 77 apartments.

    This week's council meeting (4 April) also gave the go ahead for the current building on the site, the former Central Western Daily newspaper office to be demolished.


    The newspaper has moved to new office nearby in Lords Place.

    The four story new development to be operated by Quest Apartments is valued at $10.5 million.

    The proposal includes plans for 80 car parking spaces.

    As well as apartments, the building includes conference room, a café and space for a street... Continue reading


    Orange City Council has approved plans to build a new accommodation building in Kite Street with potential for 77 apartments.

    This week's council meeting (4 April) also gave the go ahead for the current building on the site, the former Central Western Daily newspaper office to be demolished.


    The newspaper has moved to new office nearby in Lords Place.

    The four story new development to be operated by Quest Apartments is valued at $10.5 million.

    The proposal includes plans for 80 car parking spaces.

    As well as apartments, the building includes conference room, a café and space for a street front 65 seat café and leasable retail area.


  • Parking rules about sharing spaces fairly

    21 days ago
    Pinforce camera


    Recent coverage of Orange's Orange's mobile parking patrols is prompting discussion about how the system works.

    Orange City Council’s Manager of Corporate and Community Relations, Nick Redmond, said the city's parking rules were about sharing the available parking spaces fairly for the convenience of shoppers and business owners.

    "Orange is only going to get busier and parking will be harder to find," Nick Redmond said. "Business owners have to ask tough questions about whether it makes sense to use parking spaces which could be used by their customers."

    "The mobile parking system has been fine-tuned to be accurate as it... Continue reading


    Recent coverage of Orange's Orange's mobile parking patrols is prompting discussion about how the system works.

    Orange City Council’s Manager of Corporate and Community Relations, Nick Redmond, said the city's parking rules were about sharing the available parking spaces fairly for the convenience of shoppers and business owners.

    "Orange is only going to get busier and parking will be harder to find," Nick Redmond said. "Business owners have to ask tough questions about whether it makes sense to use parking spaces which could be used by their customers."

    "The mobile parking system has been fine-tuned to be accurate as it can be. Rangers have been instructed to give a driver the benefit of the doubt if it’s not clear from comparing computer images whether or not the car has moved.

    "At some point the decision about whether one driver is issued a fine or not, will and must depend on a human judgement. That’s why the system includes the opportunity to gather more evidence and appeal to an independent party, the State Debt Recovery Office.

    "The simplest way for a driver to avoid any possibility of being fined in the first place and then spending weeks or months contesting a fine, is that they should not return to park in a spot that they’ve just left."