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Orange City Council News

Orange City Council News

  • History in the making as family history conference hits town

    5 days ago
    Family history conference
    September 22, 2017

    Volunteers are gearing up for the largest family history conference in NSW to begin on Friday in Orange.

    More than 300 people, from across the country, are expected to descend on the Orange cultural precinct, for the 33rd NSW & ACT Family History Conference.

    Workshops are fully-booked but people are encouraged to register for the two day conference and attend the star-studded line-up for the series of talks on Saturday and Sunday at the Orange Civic Theatre.

    Orange Mayor Reg Kidd said the conference was one of the biggest in the country and certainly was the largest... Continue reading

    September 22, 2017

    Volunteers are gearing up for the largest family history conference in NSW to begin on Friday in Orange.

    More than 300 people, from across the country, are expected to descend on the Orange cultural precinct, for the 33rd NSW & ACT Family History Conference.

    Workshops are fully-booked but people are encouraged to register for the two day conference and attend the star-studded line-up for the series of talks on Saturday and Sunday at the Orange Civic Theatre.

    Orange Mayor Reg Kidd said the conference was one of the biggest in the country and certainly was the largest in its 33 year history.

    “Orange is a great location for this type of event and it’s wonderful that Orange City Library was invited to host the conference this year,” Cr Kidd said.

    “Council has been able to incorporate the whole civic centre precinct into the program with events at The Orange Regional Museum, The Orange Regional Gallery, The Orange Civic Theatre and of course the library.

    “Anyone with an interest in family history should make sure they attend, whether you are an avid researcher or just like to dabble in your own family story, then you should make sure you don’t miss out.”

    Central West Libraries Manager Jan Richards said the program was full of a vast range of speakers on topics ranging from photography, to food history, tracing convict ancestry and how to research genealogy on the web.

    “We have prominent historians, researchers, artists and authors giving talks on every element of family history research,” Ms Richards said.

    “If you don’t know where to start looking then this conference is for you, but equally if you’ve been
    researching for years then this conference will add value to your story.”

    Guest speakers include photographer and story teller William Yang, actor and writer William McInnes as
    well as Tasmanian artist Dr Christina Henri and historian Dr Catherine Bishop.

    Registered guests are invited to attend the conference at the Orange Civic Theatre on Saturday and Sunday and all members of the public are welcome to attend the free Family History Fair at the library on Friday.

    For information and to book tickets go to yourfamilystoryinorange.wordpress.com

    Highlights include:

    • Orange Regional Museum is hosting Roses from the Heart a unique memorial to the 25,566 convict women transported to Australia from Britain and Ireland from 1788 to 1853. The installation will include hundreds of bonnets each with the name of a female convict and the ship which brought them the Australia.
    • Orange City Library is hosting the Family History Fair from 9am to 4pm on Friday September 22 where members of the public can come along and speak with a range of different service providers and businesses in the family history industry.
    • Orange Regional Gallery is hosting William Yang: Self Portraits. The exhibition features a series of images in which the artist charts his childhood in North Queensland, his time in Sydney where he came out as a gay man, his search for identity and his trips to China. More recent images are meditations on family and mortality. Mr Yang will also be performing The Story Only I can Tell at Orange Civic Theatre on Friday September 22.
    • A tour of Duntryleague on Sunday September 24 which includes a talk by local historian and member of the Orange and District Historical Society, Ross Maroney

    HISTORY IN THE MAKING: Volunteers have a briefing ahead of the conference tomorrow (Friday September 22).
  • Mondays at the Museum now even cooler

    14 days ago
    A423034u final endurance and dogloos

    Mondays at the Museum is getting even cooler with hands-on activities about Antarctica introduced for children who attend during term 4.

    Introduced last term, Mondays at the Museum is an activity hour for children aged under 5.

    Orange Regional Museum Public Engagement and Education Officer Jess Dowdell said the response last term was “phenomenal”.

    “It’s a free event, every Monday from 10am where children get to learn and engage with history in a hands-on environment,” Ms Dowdell said.

    “They get to make something every session and take it home.

    “We introduced the event for the first time this term and... Continue reading


    Mondays at the Museum is getting even cooler with hands-on activities about Antarctica introduced for children who attend during term 4.

    Introduced last term, Mondays at the Museum is an activity hour for children aged under 5.

    Orange Regional Museum Public Engagement and Education Officer Jess Dowdell said the response last term was “phenomenal”.

    “It’s a free event, every Monday from 10am where children get to learn and engage with history in a hands-on environment,” Ms Dowdell said.

    “They get to make something every session and take it home.

    “We introduced the event for the first time this term and it booked out incredibly quickly so if you want to come along this time, get in early as numbers are limited.”

    During the beginning of term 4, children will explore the topic of Antarctica while Orange Regional Museum hosts Shackleton: Escape from Antarctica, a panel display from the National Maritime Museum.

    “Later in the term children can make their own bonnets to accompany Rose from the Heart, a display of bonnets commemorating female convicts,” Ms Dowdell said.

    “To finish off the year Christmas decorations will be created to take home.

    “Parents are encouraged to come along for the hour and join in as their children make, build and look through arts and crafts.

    “Each week parents and children will complete a craft activity, add to a display of historic buildings projected along the walls of the museum and go on a treasure hunt.”

    A complete term 4 program and information, including how to book your place, can be found here: https://mondaysmuseum.eventbrite.com.au

    Mondays at the Museum is on every Monday from 10am to 11am, except school holidays and public holidays.

    HISTORY: Children and their carers at the Orange Regional Museum during the first Mondays at the Museum event.

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  • Dog owners reminded to secure pets after latest attacks

    15 days ago
    Cattle dog 300

    September 11, 2017

    Three more incidents involving dogs over the weekend in Orange have again put the spotlight on the need for dog owners to make sure they are keeping their pets in a securely enclosed yard.

    Over the weekend Orange City Council’s dog rangers were called out to deal with three incidents.

    In two cases dogs were reported for chasing livestock on local farms nearby town.

    A bull mastiff retriever cross was seen chasing cattle and a kelpie was reported at a different location for chasing sheep.

    In both cases the ranger was able to catch the dog and... Continue reading

    September 11, 2017

    Three more incidents involving dogs over the weekend in Orange have again put the spotlight on the need for dog owners to make sure they are keeping their pets in a securely enclosed yard.

    Over the weekend Orange City Council’s dog rangers were called out to deal with three incidents.

    In two cases dogs were reported for chasing livestock on local farms nearby town.

    A bull mastiff retriever cross was seen chasing cattle and a kelpie was reported at a different location for chasing sheep.

    In both cases the ranger was able to catch the dog and the owners will be looking at control orders and fines.

    Orange City Council Manager Corporate and Community Relations Nick Redmond said it was lucky that in these two cases none of the livestock were injured.

    "In terms of the law, what happened is an incident that is still punishable by control orders and fines," he said.

    "In the latest incident, a dog escaped from its yard at a suburban address, then rushed at and bit a young boy riding his scooter.

    "When the boy jumped from his bike and ran away, the dog bit him again.

    "The dog involved has been surrendered by its owner and will be euthanased.

    "These incidents, in the wake of the serious attack at Canobolas High points to the need for owners to make sure their dogs are securely locked in a yard at all times, or tied up so that they can’t escape.

    "It’s a tragedy for all involved when an incident like this happens, and a family pet has to be put down or a child suffers from a bite.

    Our focus has always got to be on community safety, to make sure a dog is always under control."


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  • Council rangers respond to dog attack on livestock at high school.

    20 days ago
    New logo clear background

    Wednesday September 6

    UPDATE AT 4PM: The two dogs responsible for the attack on livestock at Canobolas Rural Technology High School have been surrendered to council.

    ******************************************************************************************************************************

    2pm: Orange City council rangers have located the owner of two dogs implicated in an attack on livestock on Tuesday morning.

    Orange City Council rangers were called, by Orange police, to Canobolas Rural Technology High School at about 7.45am yesterday (September 5) after reports two dogs had attacked livestock.

    The numbers have not yet been finalised but looks like up to 15 sheep, two alpacas and two goats were killed or have since... Continue reading

    Wednesday September 6

    UPDATE AT 4PM: The two dogs responsible for the attack on livestock at Canobolas Rural Technology High School have been surrendered to council.

    ******************************************************************************************************************************

    2pm: Orange City council rangers have located the owner of two dogs implicated in an attack on livestock on Tuesday morning.

    Orange City Council rangers were called, by Orange police, to Canobolas Rural Technology High School at about 7.45am yesterday (September 5) after reports two dogs had attacked livestock.

    The numbers have not yet been finalised but looks like up to 15 sheep, two alpacas and two goats were killed or have since been put down.

    Council rangers acted quickly and as a result the team was able to locate the dogs’ owner.

    One dog has been secured within the property while police and council rangers are investigating the location of the second.

    Rangers will continue to monitor the property to ensure the owner is complying with control orders.

    The owner is facing thousands of dollars in fines and possible court action.

    The owner is being urged to surrender the dogs.

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  • Workshops booked but registrations still open for family history conference

    22 days ago
    William mcinnes

    With only 3 weeks to go until the 2017 NSW & ACT Association of Family History Societies Conference workshops are fully booked but registrations are still open.

    The Orange cultural precinct is hosting one of the biggest events in the industry on September 22 to 24 when more than 300 family history enthusiasts are expected to converge on the city for a series of presentations, workshops and exhibitions.

    Orange City Library is hosting the three day conference with events held in the library, Orange Civic Theatre, Orange Regional Museum and Orange Regional Gallery.

    Orange City Council’s Director of Community Recreation... Continue reading


    With only 3 weeks to go until the 2017 NSW & ACT Association of Family History Societies Conference workshops are fully booked but registrations are still open.

    The Orange cultural precinct is hosting one of the biggest events in the industry on September 22 to 24 when more than 300 family history enthusiasts are expected to converge on the city for a series of presentations, workshops and exhibitions.

    Orange City Library is hosting the three day conference with events held in the library, Orange Civic Theatre, Orange Regional Museum and Orange Regional Gallery.

    Orange City Council’s Director of Community Recreation and Cultural Services Scott Maunder said the conference was a great example of how the entire cultural precinct was being used to its full advantage.
    “We have excellent facilities in the library, theatre, gallery and museum and it’s great they’re all in the same location,” Mr Maunder said.

    “This conference is fantastic for the whole city as 300 delegates fill up accommodation rooms, eat at restaurants and cafes and shop in the CBD.

    “Orange City Library has done a great job in convincing the conference organisers to host the event in Orange for the first time and we certainly hope it’ll be the first of many.”

    Central West Libraries Manager Jan Richards said family history groups from across the country would be treated to a program of professional speakers that would explore the many ways of relating stories to ancestors.

    “I am excited this year’s conference will be held in Orange because I am a very keen family historian,” Ms Richards said.

    “We’re delighted to present a wide ranging program with experts in the fields of telling, recording and preserving your family history.”

    “Highlights include the keynote address by William McInnes, exploring the stories of gaolbird ancestors, using food to tell the family story and dating family portraits using fashion.”

    A Family History Fair, open to all, will be held on Friday 22nd September from 9am – 4pm at Orange City Library.

    The Fair includes displays by family history societies from across the country as well as companies, which supply services to family history enthusiasts.

    For more information and the registration form, please go to the website https://yourfamilystoryinorange.wordpress.com/

    HISTORY: The Orange Family History group is looking forward to the start of the 2017 NSW & ACT Association of Family History Societies Conference.

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  • Election candidates advised on poster rules

    25 days ago
    Vote here sign 300


    1 September 2017

    Orange City Council has provided information to candidates in the upcoming council election about where they can display their advertising posters.

    The same NSW Government regulations which cover candidate posters during state elections also apply to local council elections.

    The Parliamentary Electorates and Elections Act of 1912 prohibits posters from being placed on any crown or community-owned land, which includes trees on road verges, alongside highways, on council buildings or other structures or in parks.

    The posters can be displayed on private property with the permission of the owner.

    During the last state election, council received a... Continue reading


    1 September 2017

    Orange City Council has provided information to candidates in the upcoming council election about where they can display their advertising posters.

    The same NSW Government regulations which cover candidate posters during state elections also apply to local council elections.

    The Parliamentary Electorates and Elections Act of 1912 prohibits posters from being placed on any crown or community-owned land, which includes trees on road verges, alongside highways, on council buildings or other structures or in parks.

    The posters can be displayed on private property with the permission of the owner.

    During the last state election, council received a number of complaints about posters. Council rangers removed posters and a letter was written to candidates encouraging them to comply with regulations.

    In the lead-up to this election, Orange City Council has received a number of complaints regarding campaign posters being placed in public areas, and being attached to trees and power poles. As a result, council is providing information to all candidates via the email address they supplied to the Electoral Commission about the legal obligations for displaying posters at election time.



    _________________________________________________________________

    MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE REGULATIONS :


    Parliamentary Electorates and Elections Act 1912 No 41

    151B Exhibition of posters

    (2A) A person shall not post up, or permit or cause to be posted up, a poster:

    (a) on or within any premises occupied or used by, or under the control or management of:

    (i) the Crown, any instrumentality or agency of the Crown, or any statutory body representing the Crown or any other body prescribed by the regulations as a statutory body representing the Crown, or

    (ii) any local authority, or

    (b) in the case of premises which have no one in occupation, on or within those premises, unless that person has obtained:

    (i) in the case of premises owned by one person alone, the permission in writing of that person, or

    (ii) in the case of premises owned by two or more persons, whether as joint tenants or as tenants in common or otherwise, the permission in writing of at least one of those persons.

    It is noted that the definition of ‘premises’ under this Act includes “any structure, building, vehicle or vessel or any place, whether built on or not, and any part thereof”.

    Electoral signs on public roads and/or private land (i.e. land not Council or Crown land) do not require Development Consent, providing they meet the exempt development standards set out in the SEPP below, AND have the consent of the landowner:

    State Environmental Planning Policy (Exempt and Complying Development Codes) 2008

    2.83 General requirements

    (1) To be exempt development under this code, development specified in this Division must:

    (a) have the consent in writing of the owner of the land on which the sign is to be located and, if the sign or part of the sign projects over adjoining land, the consent of the owner of the adjoining land, and

    (b) be approved under section 138 of the Roads Act 1993, if the sign or part of the sign projects over a public road, including a footway.

    Subdivision 13 Election signs

    2.107 Development standards

    The standards specified for that development are that the development must:

    (a) not be more than 0.8m2 in area, and

    (b) if on the site of a heritage item or draft heritage item—not be attached to a building, and

    (c) be displayed by or on behalf of a candidate at an election referred to in clause 2.106 or the party (if any) of any such candidate, and

    (d) be displayed in accordance with any relevant requirements of the Act under which the election is held, and

    (e) be displayed only during the following periods:

    (i) 5 weeks immediately preceding the day on which the election is held,

    (ii) the day on which the election is held,

    (iii) 1 week immediately following the day on which the election is held.

    The NSW Electoral Commission also sets out the additional guidance (http://www.elections.nsw.gov.au/candidates_and_parties/electoral_material/posters):

    - Posters are not to be exhibited on or in unoccupied premises, unless permission has first been obtained from the owner.

    - It is also unlawful to attach posters to telegraph poles without the written consent of the appropriate electricity provider.


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  • Talk shines light on changing role of factory

    29 days ago
    Inside 1

    In 70 years the face of Orange has changed significantly and much of that change can be attributed to the old Electrolux factory.

    From making ammunition for the war effort to decades later employing more than 2000 people to make fridges.

    Weapons and Whitegoods author, Elizabeth Edwards will delve into the life and times of those who first crossed the gates when the building was a small arms factory in 1941 to the last Electrolux employee who walked out of the main gates in 2016, at the Orange Regional Museum on Saturday.

    “Many people know much of the story of... Continue reading


    In 70 years the face of Orange has changed significantly and much of that change can be attributed to the old Electrolux factory.

    From making ammunition for the war effort to decades later employing more than 2000 people to make fridges.

    Weapons and Whitegoods author, Elizabeth Edwards will delve into the life and times of those who first crossed the gates when the building was a small arms factory in 1941 to the last Electrolux employee who walked out of the main gates in 2016, at the Orange Regional Museum on Saturday.

    “Many people know much of the story of Electrolux but Ms Edwards will detail what a significant contribution the factory, and its employees had in shaping the city of Orange,” Museum manager Alison Russell said.

    “The face of Orange would look very different if hundreds of migrant had not flocked here in 1949 to work at the Emmco factory.

    “With a short fall in housing in the city, Factory management decided to house the migrants in tents or in boarding houses.

    “A Commonwealth Hostel located next to the factory was opened in 1952 and provided a temporary home for employees for a number of years.

    “The migrants then made Orange their home, opened restaurants serving food from their home country, many opened small businesses or applied their skills in other way and really changed the course of Orange, its CBD and its economy.”

    Currently on display at Orange Regional Museum is a 1956 Westinghouse refrigerator and the last fridge off the factory line in Orange in 2016.

    There is no question that manufacturing and Electrolux were a large source of employment in Orange but by the time the factory had closed, health, retail and education had long ago taken the lead on the list of employment sectors.

    This lecture will delve into the varying contributions generations of factory employees made to the community.

    The 2pm lecture on Saturday is a free event but bookings are advised, call 6393 8444 or go to https://electroluxlecture.eventbrite.com.au


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  • New campaign reveals why a metre matters

    about 1 month ago
    A metre matters 3

    Drivers are being reminded to keep one metre away from cyclists when overtaking on roads around Orange.

    Orange is the first local government area in the state to be the focus of the ‘A METRE MATTERS’ awareness campaign funded by Transport for NSW and the RMS.

    Orange City Council’s Works Depot Manager Wayne Gailey said two local buses will now carry the road safety message.

    “Orange has a growing number of residents who are choosing to make the daily commute by bicycle and through the ‘Cycle Towns’ program, the council has been working with the RMS and Transport for... Continue reading


    Drivers are being reminded to keep one metre away from cyclists when overtaking on roads around Orange.

    Orange is the first local government area in the state to be the focus of the ‘A METRE MATTERS’ awareness campaign funded by Transport for NSW and the RMS.


    Orange City Council’s Works Depot Manager Wayne Gailey said two local buses will now carry the road safety message.

    “Orange has a growing number of residents who are choosing to make the daily commute by bicycle and through the ‘Cycle Towns’ program, the council has been working with the RMS and Transport for NSW to make Orange more attractive for people to choose to walk or ride as part of their daily commute,” Wayne Gailey said.
    “Campaigns like this are about encouraging drivers to share the road.”

    “The slogan that A METRE MATTERS is an easy reference point to the road rules both for drivers and cyclists. It means that drivers should make sure there is at least a metre between their car and a cyclist when they overtake.”

    “It also a reminder of the road rules for when a car overtakes a cyclist. When it is safe and there is no oncoming traffic, a car is allowed to move over the centre lane to pass a bike, and at all times they must keep one metre away.”

    The advertising artwork on the backs of buses is provided by Transport for NSW, with particular support from the RMS, and is being implemented by Orange City Council through the Cycle Towns program, with funding from the RMS.

    Similar strategies are also in place in the ACT, Queensland, Tasmania and South Australia.

    "When driving a car it’s important to remember we’re in control of around 1200 to 2000 kilograms of metal,” Wayne Gailey said.

    “When we’re driving at 50 kms/hr that means the car is a large object travelling at 14 metres per second. That’s enough momentum to kill or injure a cyclist in an instant.”

    “Keeping at least metre away is a crucial benchmark for drivers.”

    Orange City Council’s Cycling Committee chair Steve Martin said while cyclists must also share the responsibility for riding safely on the roads, it’s up to drivers to keep a safe distance.

    “Every cyclist can tell of incidents when a car has come too close to be safe,” Steve Martin said.

    “The NSW Government changed the roads rules in March last year (2016) making it clear that when the speed limit is under 60 km/hr, a car has to stay one metre away when passing a cyclist.”

    “When the speed limit is more than 60 km/hour , the required distance is 1.5 metres.”


    Drivers caught not allowing the minimum distance when passing a bicycle rider face a $330 fine and a penalty of two demerit points.

    Nationally, the ‘A METRE MATTERS’ campaign has been supported by the Amy Gillett Foundation
    The Amy Gillett Foundation was established in 2005 following the death of Amy Gillett, killed by a driver in 2005 while cycling in Germany with the Australian women’s cycling team.

    Orange Buslines Manager Tim Smith said his company welcomed the opportunity to be involved in a campaign to make Orange’s roads safer.

    “It’s an important message and we’re pleased to be a part of this campaign,” Tim Smith said.

    “As our city grows, the number of cars and bikes is also increasing, and that means we need to find ways to share the roads safely and courteously.”

    METRE MATTERS: Cyclist Steve Martin with Orange Highway Patrol Senior Constable Alison Hodge and Orange City Council Works Depot Manager Wayne Gailey.

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  • Council to demolish old Kurim shops

    about 1 month ago
    Derelict kurim shops 2 300


    Thursday, August 17 2017.

    Orange City Council will go ahead with an order to demolish the old Kurim shops in Kurim Ave, Glenroi.

    Council will proceed with the order after all options to work with the owner of the property have been exhausted.

    Tenders will be called in the coming weeks for companies to demolish the property and a development application will be lodged.

    The cost of the demolition, will be passed onto the owner of the property.

    It’s anticipated it will be several months before work begins.


    Orange City Council's Corporate and Community Relations Manager Nick Redmond said it... Continue reading


    Thursday, August 17 2017.

    Orange City Council will go ahead with an order to demolish the old Kurim shops in Kurim Ave, Glenroi.

    Council will proceed with the order after all options to work with the owner of the property have been exhausted.

    Tenders will be called in the coming weeks for companies to demolish the property and a development application will be lodged.

    The cost of the demolition, will be passed onto the owner of the property.

    It’s anticipated it will be several months before work begins.


    Orange City Council's Corporate and Community Relations Manager Nick Redmond said it had been a long running and difficult situation.

    “This has been an ongoing saga of about ten years and council understands the community’s frustration that it has taken so long to resolve” Mr Redmond said.

    “This is a very serious decision the council has taken and it is certainly not taken lightly. It's been a thorough process.

    “There are many checks and balances to go through before this kind of action can be taken and it is certainly appropriate that all of the options are considered before a demolition order is given.

    “This building has been abandoned for a decade. It is falling apart, it is a safety hazard and the residents have had enough.”


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  • Elm Leaf Beetles get the tree-tment

    about 1 month ago
    Elm bettle
    Wednesday August 16.

    Orange City Council’s tree crew has begun its counter-attack on the city’s Elm Leaf Beetle population.

    An infestation of Elm Leaf Beetles last Summer, left the city’s Elm trees with skeletonized leaves or defoliated tree canopies.

    The beetles won’t kill Elm trees but repeated, long-term leaf damage can have a significant impact on a tree’s health.



    Orange City Council’s City Presentation Manager Nigel Hobden said now was the ideal time to begin treatments using insecticides in a bid to prepare the trees ahead of the warmer months.

    “We’re using two different methods to control the Elm... Continue reading

    Wednesday August 16.

    Orange City Council’s tree crew has begun its counter-attack on the city’s Elm Leaf Beetle population.

    An infestation of Elm Leaf Beetles last Summer, left the city’s Elm trees with skeletonized leaves or defoliated tree canopies.

    The beetles won’t kill Elm trees but repeated, long-term leaf damage can have a significant impact on a tree’s health.



    Orange City Council’s City Presentation Manager Nigel Hobden said now was the ideal time to begin treatments using insecticides in a bid to prepare the trees ahead of the warmer months.

    “We’re using two different methods to control the Elm Beetles depending on the size and age of the tree ; inserting tablets into the soil or making injections into the tree trunk,” Mr Hobden said.

    “You might have noticed that bitumen has been removed around the base of some street trees over the last few months. In younger, smaller street Elms we’ve been digging several pesticide tablets into the ground around the roots of the trees.

    “The tablets will dissolve over time, the tree roots will absorb the insecticide and carry it to the tree’s leaves. This week’s rain will help dissolve the tablets.

    The beetles will hatch in the warmer months, travel to the top of the tree, eat the leaves and be affected by the insecticides. Mr Hobden said the tablets did not impact on the health of the tree nor the nearby biodiversity in the soil.

    However, older, larger trees needed to be treated differently using injections straight into the trunk of the tree.

    “We’ll be injecting the older and larger trees with insecticides in the coming weeks as the trees start to bud. The sap will take the pesticides up the tree and into the leaves in a similar way to how the tablets work.

    “For this reason, we’re asking the community not to place the adhesive tape around street trees at this time of the year. It’s important the beetles can reach the top of the tree to eat the leaves in order to ingest the insecticides. For that reason, residents can expect to see leaf damage again this year, but it’s a step in the right direction.”

    Mr Hobden said residents could treat any Elm trees on their own private property using store bought tablets around the trees’ base, but larger trees would need an injection into the trunk.

    The tape can be effective in trees that have not had insecticides used on them and people are welcome to use tape on their own trees in their backyards.

    “It’s important residents seek advice from a qualified arborist to understand what treatment is best for each tree,” Mr Hobden said.

    BACKGROUND INFORMATION :
    The life cycle of the Elm Leaf Beetle (ELB) has the adults emerging from hibernation under the ground about October and they lay eggs in November.

    Both the adult beetles and larvae feed on the leaves; the adults producing a ‘shot hole’ like appearance to the leaves and the larvae skeletonizing the leaf tissue.

    Using an insecticide that is transported to the leaves and is then ingested by the beetles and larvae, will assist with controlling the ELB population and reducing the overall damage to the tree.

    When a larger tree is injected, the insecticide, will be transported via the sapwood up the tree and into the leaves in a similar way to how the tablets work.

    Banding trees with adhesive tape is effective when the larvae are moving down the trunk to pupate in the ground, as such banding can assist in a life cycle interruption and is generally performed in late December and January when the larvae crawl down the trunk.

    COUNTER-ATTACK: Orange City Council's tree crew members John Clark and Dean Sutherland bury insecticide tablets near Elms in Byng Street.

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