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Orange City Council News

Orange City Council News

  • Mini music festival plans unveiled for Orange

    9 days ago
    Jam1
    Friday, February 9, 2018

    Orange’s array of contemporary music talent will be on show next month, with the staging of a mini music festival in a string of venues around Robertson Park.

    Organisers today unveiled plans for JAM SATURDAY, a 1-day event which will see more than 50 performers entertaining crowds in a dozen cafes, pubs, shops, and other venues dotted around Robertson Park.

    The event, on Saturday 24 March, is being organized by JAM Orange, with support from the NSW Government, Orange City Council and local businesses.


    JAM Orange secretary Paul Kelly said there’s a lot of excitement...

    Friday, February 9, 2018

    Orange’s array of contemporary music talent will be on show next month, with the staging of a mini music festival in a string of venues around Robertson Park.

    Organisers today unveiled plans for JAM SATURDAY, a 1-day event which will see more than 50 performers entertaining crowds in a dozen cafes, pubs, shops, and other venues dotted around Robertson Park.

    The event, on Saturday 24 March, is being organized by JAM Orange, with support from the NSW Government, Orange City Council and local businesses.


    JAM Orange secretary Paul Kelly said there’s a lot of excitement among local musicians about next month’s event.

    “JAM Orange has been staging concerts in local venues for many months now,” Paul Kelly said. “We’ve had a string of performances by touring acts and local musicians and that has shown us there is a strong demand and interest in the ‘live’ music scene.”

    “The JAM SATURDAY event is aiming to take that interest to a new level, and we’re very grateful for the backing of the State Government, Orange City Council and local sponsors.”

    Orange City Council’s Services Committee chair, Cr Kevin Duffy said the decision to stage this event across a dozen different venues is a good move.

    “The beauty of a music festival is that music fans will be able enjoy a smorgasbord of local performers by strolling to venues that are all with a stone’s throw of Robertson Park,” Cr Kevin Duffy said.

    “Less than a block away from the park, people will be able to sit in their choice of cafes and pubs and other stores and enjoy live music.”

    “The best thing is that all the concerts across the day will be free. People might buy a drink or a meal in their choice of venue, but the show will be free.

    “With the festival funding, all the professional performers will be paid for their shows, and by doing that we’re working on developing a local live music scene.”

    The festival was unveiled in McNamara Lane alongside a number of the venues, Blind Pig cafe, Grocer & Co and the Parkview Hotel.

    Among the more unusual venues, are plans for a musical taxi. On the day, taxi customers can choose to take a trip from the Robertson Park taxi rank with a musician sitting in the front seat, to perform during their trip.

    $20,000 funding for the festival is coming from the NSW Government’s Create NSW program and the LIVE MUSIC Office.

    This funding is being matched by Orange City Council ($15,000) and local businesses ($5,000.) The total funding covers equipment costs and payments to musicians.

    JAM: Members of JAM get together ahead of the JAM Saturday festival.

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  • Council makes progress on fire hydrant checking

    5 days ago


    6 February 2018

    In the wake of a major fire in William Street in February last year (2017), Orange City has stepped up its system of testing water hydrants.

    The current round of testing is almost complete, but like painting the Harbour Bridge, it will be an ongoing project that will get an ongoing priority.

    The William street fire showed up potential problems when valves had been turned off inadvertently.

    Valves are used to turn water flow off and on in a water main. The valves can shut down a section of water main in order to repair a break,...


    6 February 2018

    In the wake of a major fire in William Street in February last year (2017), Orange City has stepped up its system of testing water hydrants.

    The current round of testing is almost complete, but like painting the Harbour Bridge, it will be an ongoing project that will get an ongoing priority.

    The William street fire showed up potential problems when valves had been turned off inadvertently.

    Valves are used to turn water flow off and on in a water main. The valves can shut down a section of water main in order to repair a break, undertake maintenance or install a new water main or water service to a property.

    There are 4,131 valves across Orange’s streets.

    Since March last year 100% of the valves have been inspected to see if they can be found and how visible they are. To make them easy to find, both valves and hydrant covers are painted a contrasting colour.

    So far 88% of the valves have been tested to check if the water can be turned on and off and that process is continuing.

    The other element in the water infrastructure is hydrants, where fire-fighting equipment can be connected to a water line. There are 4,758 hydrants in Orange. 98% have been inspected to check if they are able to be used and are visible. A further round of water-flow and pressure testing is continuing.

    Where defects are found, a program of repairs and maintenance has already begun. Council has bought a truck-mounted vacuuming machine at a cost of around $250,000 which clears dirt from the inside of the valves and hydrants so they can be used.

    On top of the cost of the vacuum-truck, the council has spent more than $300,000 on this program including putting on four extra contract staff


  • Orange welcomes baton relay

    18 days ago
    Baton bearer 1


    30 January 2018

    The Orange community turned out to watch as the Queen's Baton Relay journeyed through local streets on its way to the Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast in April.

    Community events on the grass roof of the Regional Museum and at the Anzac Park sports centre drew good numbers.



    30 January 2018

    The Orange community turned out to watch as the Queen's Baton Relay journeyed through local streets on its way to the Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast in April.

    Community events on the grass roof of the Regional Museum and at the Anzac Park sports centre drew good numbers.


  • Museum to re-open during FOOD Week

    26 days ago
    Museum night
    Tuesday, January 23, 2018

    Orange Regional Museum’s first exhibition Journeys: people, place, stories comes to a close in February after about 48,000 people walked through the doors.

    Opened in November 2016 Journeys has told the stories of the region, from how Indigenous people used the land to the time of European settlement and the development of technology and transport in the Central West.


    Mayor Reg Kidd said the success of the first exhibition was evident in the number of people who visited.

    “Over 1,500 children attended educational workshops and many of the students came from schools from across the central...

    Tuesday, January 23, 2018

    Orange Regional Museum’s first exhibition Journeys: people, place, stories comes to a close in February after about 48,000 people walked through the doors.

    Opened in November 2016 Journeys has told the stories of the region, from how Indigenous people used the land to the time of European settlement and the development of technology and transport in the Central West.


    Mayor Reg Kidd said the success of the first exhibition was evident in the number of people who visited.

    “Over 1,500 children attended educational workshops and many of the students came from schools from across the central west,” he said.

    “While they were here many went through the Orange Regional Gallery, the Orange City Library and saw a show at the Orange Civic Theatre.

    “The Orange Regional Museum is a modern museum, which means the exhibition changes constantly.

    “The changes keep people coming back and encourage people from across the state to pop in and see what’s new.

    “I’m looking forward to the installation of the next exhibition at the museum, Paddock to Plate: a history of food and wine in Orange and district and seeing just how our food culture has developed.”

    From Monday 5th February the Orange Regional Museum will close so the team can begin the installation and construction of the new exhibition, which will celebrate the rich food and wine history of Orange and the region.

    Orange City Council’s Services Policy Committee Chair Kevin Duffy said the installation of the new exhibition would take about 9 weeks and would open during FOOD Week.

    “The Orange Regional Museum will be the official FOOD HQ for this year’s FOOD Week, which will fit in with the exhibition wonderfully,” Cr Duffy said.

    “The exhibition will include over 200 historical objects and will have an increased focus on interactivity and hands on engagement.”

    Opening on Saturday 7th April the new exhibition will tell the story of how innovative people made the best out of the excellent climate and soils in the district to create unique flavours.

    The community can keep up to date with the progress of Paddock to Plate: a history of food and wine in Orange and district via the Museum’s social media channels and website.


    HISTORY: The 1926 Chevrolet, Emma, on display at Orange Regional Museum during Journeys; People, Place, Stories

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  • Be involved in the Queen's Baton Relay

    26 days ago
    Map graphic
    Tuesday, January 23, 2018

    Orange is set to erupt into Commonwealth Games fanfare on Tuesday as the Queen's Baton Relay passes through the city.

    There will be jumping castles, face-painting, games and family-friendly entertainment to mark the historical occasion.

    Since the Queen's Baton left Buckingham Palace in London in March last year, it has journeyed through Africa, the Americas, Europe, Asia and Oceania before arriving in Australia. The baton arrives in Orange on the morning of Tuesday 30 January on its way to the Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast on April 4.

    Orange Mayor Reg Kidd said there were...

    Tuesday, January 23, 2018

    Orange is set to erupt into Commonwealth Games fanfare on Tuesday as the Queen's Baton Relay passes through the city.

    There will be jumping castles, face-painting, games and family-friendly entertainment to mark the historical occasion.

    Since the Queen's Baton left Buckingham Palace in London in March last year, it has journeyed through Africa, the Americas, Europe, Asia and Oceania before arriving in Australia. The baton arrives in Orange on the morning of Tuesday 30 January on its way to the Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast on April 4.

    Orange Mayor Reg Kidd said there were plenty of opportunities to see the baton, take photos and spur on the baton bearers as they carry the baton from Orange High School, Calare Public School through to the Sir Neville Howse Indoor Sports stadium in Byng Street.

    "I'd encourage everyone who is available to line the streets and cheer our 18 baton bearers on as they represent the central west in the international relay," Cr Kidd said.

    "The best vantage points are in Robertson Park, on the Museum roof, at the Anzac Park stadium (PCYC), or of course Summer Street as it passes through.

    "We're incredibly lucky to have been chosen to host the baton. The last time we had the honour was in 2006. So, rally your friends or colleagues and hopefully you're able to get down to the main street between about 10am and about 10.40am join in the community spirit. The runners come down summer street from 10.34am to 10.42am)

    "Put on your Aussie memorabilia, or indeed the colours of any country participating in the Commonwealth Games at the Gold Coast and be part of history."

    Residents can attend two community events involving the baton, the first, on the Orange Regional Museum (at about 10.48am) is the official welcome from Mayor Reg Kidd as well as Member for Orange Phil Donato and Member for Calare Andrew Gee.

    Cr Kidd encouraged people to then jump in the car and head to the second community event, which was a bit more relaxed.

    The second community event, at the ANZAC Park sports stadium will involve a free concert by and stand-up show by comedian Sean Murphy (staring at 9.30am), a barbecue, jumping castles, face painting and craft while families await the arrival of the 900 metre long baton convoy at about 11.19am.

    Once it pulls up, there will be plenty of opportunities to take photos.

    To see a map of the convoy route and approximate time it will be at various locations follow this link.

    2006: Photo of crowds greeting the baton when it came through Orange in 2006.

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  • Everything you need to know about Orange's Australia Day celebrations

    27 days ago
    5


    19 January 2018

    Australia Day in Orange has always been one of the highlights on the city's event calendar and the 2018 celebrations are no exception, according to Orange Mayor Reg Kidd.

    Cr Kidd said he was looking forward to welcoming 24 new citizens from India, Britain, Nepal, Zimbabwe, South Africa and New Zealand.

    "The Australia Day celebration in Cook Park has always been one of my favourite events in the Orange community," Cr Kidd said.

    "It's wonderful we can welcome so many new people who want to make Orange their home, who want to be part of our community...


    19 January 2018

    Australia Day in Orange has always been one of the highlights on the city's event calendar and the 2018 celebrations are no exception, according to Orange Mayor Reg Kidd.

    Cr Kidd said he was looking forward to welcoming 24 new citizens from India, Britain, Nepal, Zimbabwe, South Africa and New Zealand.

    "The Australia Day celebration in Cook Park has always been one of my favourite events in the Orange community," Cr Kidd said.

    "It's wonderful we can welcome so many new people who want to make Orange their home, who want to be part of our community and who want to publicly do so.

    "This year we had a large number of strong candidates for the NSW Citizen of the Year awards and I think that reflects the nature of our city.

    "Our city is one of givers. Our city is built on the kind deeds of so many of our community members and it's great we can thank them for all their hard work in this way."

    The celebrations will start at 8am with a breakfast barbecue cooked by Orange Canobolas Lions Club Catering Van, Rotary Club of Orange, Quota and CWA.

    The breakfast includes a bacon and egg roll, a juice or coffee or tea as well as apples and will be served until about 9.30am.

    Children's amusement rides, face painting, petting zoo and the Gold Seekers Orienteering maze begins at 8am and will continue until about 1pm. Rides cost $3 each or $10 for an unlimited pass for the day.

    There will also be a competition for best dressed, a vintage car display, dozens of market stalls and a $1 monster raffle with a range of prizes donated by local businesses.

    Cr Kidd said there had been some concern among the community regrading the Flying Foxes roosting in the Cook Park trees.

    "I can assure everyone that concern is unwarranted," Cr Kidd said.

    "The Australia Day celebrations will go ahead as normal, as they have every other year and we'll co-exist with the Flying Foxes.

    "They're roosting in a couple of the trees towards the Kite Street side of the park and we'll be holding our celebrations towards the Summer Street side."

    The program for the day is as follows:

    8:20am PERFORMANCE BY ORANGE MALE VOICE CHOIR

    8:40am PERFORMANCE BY CANOBOLAS HIGHLAND PIPE BAND

    9:00am OFFICIAL CEREMONY

    Mr Neil Gill, Master of Ceremonies

    WELCOME TO COUNTRY

    Mr Jamie Newman

    FLAG RAISING CEREMONY

    Conducted by 2nd Orange Scouts

    AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL ANTHEM

    Orange Male Voice Choir

    PRESENTATION OF STUDENT PHOTOGRAPHY AND CWD COLOURING IN COMPETITION PRIZES

    Proudly brought to you by the Central Western Daily and the Australia Day Community Committee

    9.30am WELCOME TO AUSTRALIA DAY 2018

    Mayor of Orange, Cr Reg Kidd

    Member for Orange. Philip Donato, MP

    Chair of Australia Day Committee, Ms Katherine Tollner

    OFFICIAL ADDRESS BY AUSTRALIA DAY AMBASSADOR

    Ms. Annabelle Williams OAM – Paralympic Gold medallist and Legal Counsel for the Australian Olympic Committee

    10.00am CITIZENSHIP CEREMONY.

    10.30am PRESENTATION OF THE NSW LOCAL CITIZEN OF THE YEAR AWARDS:

    Community Group of the Year

    Community Event of the Year

    Local Legend

    Business Philanthropy

    Young Citizen of the Year

    Citizen of the Year

    11.00am COLOUR CITY DANCE WORKS PERFORMANCE

    MEET THE AMBASSADOR

    Ms. Annabelle Williams OAM

    11:30am DESI AUSSIES OF ORANGE DANCE PERFORMANCE

    BEST DRESSED COMPETITION

    AUSTRALIA DAY RAFFLE

    Drawn by Australia Day Ambassador, Ms. Annabelle Williams.

    12:00pm PERFORMANCE BY CITY OF ORANGE BRASS BAND

    PERFORMANCE BY EAST ORANGE PHYSICAL CULTURE CLUB




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  • Orange set to welcome international baton relay

    about 1 month ago
    Kurt fearnley with queen's baton


    19 January 2017

    Final preparations are under way for the stopover by the Queen’s Baton Relay (QBR) in Orange.

    Since it left Buckingham Palace in London in March last year, the baton has journeyed through Africa, the Americas, Europe, Asia and Oceania before arriving in Australia on Christmas Eve. The baton arrives in Orange on the morning of Tuesday 30 January on its way to the Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast on April 4.

    In the NSW central west, the baton comes to Orange from West Wyalong, Forbes and Parkes the day before it reaches Orange. After spending the...


    19 January 2017

    Final preparations are under way for the stopover by the Queen’s Baton Relay (QBR) in Orange.

    Since it left Buckingham Palace in London in March last year, the baton has journeyed through Africa, the Americas, Europe, Asia and Oceania before arriving in Australia on Christmas Eve. The baton arrives in Orange on the morning of Tuesday 30 January on its way to the Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast on April 4.

    In the NSW central west, the baton comes to Orange from West Wyalong, Forbes and Parkes the day before it reaches Orange. After spending the morning in Orange the baton travels on to Wellington before spending the night in Dubbo.

    READY TO RUN: Baton bearer Dr David Howe and Orange mayor Reg Kidd are looking forward to the 30 January event. Details of road closures have now been released.

    One of the local baton bearers, Dr David Howe is looking forward to taking a turn carrying the baton.

    "I remember at the 2000 Olympics and seeing all the torch runners and thinking what an honour it would be to do something like this," David Howe said. "Now having this come through Orange and having an opportunity to be involved, I'm very proud."

    Orange Mayor Reg Kidd said there’ll be many opportunities for local residents to see the baton convoy pass by on Tuesday 30 January.

    “The baton will make two school visits at Calare Public and Orange High, before community events at the Civic Square and the Anzac Park sports centre,” Cr Reg Kidd said. “The easiest places to see the baton convoy passing will be as it journeys along Byng Street and in Summer Street, and in Robertson Park. We’re expecting hundreds of people will turn out to line the streets.

    “As well as the person carrying the baton, the whole convoy is around nine hundred (900) metres long, and for that reason there will be some road closures. We’re asking people to plan ahead and be patient with the impact of these closures.

    “It will be like Anzac Day. As the baton convoy travels through Byng Street and Summer St, to keep people safe, traffic will be closed off in each of those streets and access from cross streets will be closed.

    “The timing of each road closure is being released today along with route maps and it’s all available online. It’s important that anyone who plans to be driving in these areas on that morning, checks out these details and plans ahead. Businesses in Summer Street should also look closely to see when the main street will be closed to traffic and plan ahead. Look at the route of the convoy and avoid those areas if you can.”

    Electronic message boards will be in place advising drivers of the street closures and suggesting detours.

    The key closure will be both lanes of Summer St which will be closed from Woodward St to William St from 9.55 am.

    As the convoy passes, it’s expected Summer St will be progressively opened to westbound traffic starting from around 11 am.

    Convoy time-table

    This table shows the location and time-table of the QBR convoy.

    Location

    Approx Times

    Duration

    Travel Parkes to Orange

    07:43 - 09:10

    01.27

    Calare Public School

    09:10 - 09:55

    0.45

    Calare to Orange High

    9.55-10.08

    0.12

    Orange High School

    10.08 -10.17

    0.08

    Orange High to Robertson Park

    10.17 -10.42

    0.24

    Robertson Park to Museum Roof

    10.42 -10.48

    0.06

    Orange Regional Museum Roof

    10.48 -10.58

    0.10

    Museum Roof to Byng St (Park St Corner)

    10.58 -11.13

    0.15

    Byng St (Corner of Park St) to Anzac Park

    11.13 -11.19

    0.06

    Anzac Park

    11.19 -11.29

    0.10

    Convoy Team Break

    11.29 -11.54

    0.25

    Travel : Orange to Wellington

    11.54 -13.18

    01.23

    Street closures

    Streets will be closed from around 15 minutes before the convoy arrives and will be re-opened progressively once the convoy has left each location. The times in this table are provided to assist local residents to plan, but should be taken as an approximate guide. There may be unexpected delays.

    Streets

    Closed from :

    Open from :

    Frost St (From Wentworth Lane to Coronation Drive)

    9.05

    9.56

    Coronation Drive (From Frost to Woodward St)

    9.50

    10.20

    Woodward (From Summer St to March St, )

    9.55

    10.20

    Byng St (From Woodward to Hill St)

    9.55

    10.25

    Hill St (From Byng St to Summer St )

    9.55

    10.30

    Summer St (From Woodward St to William St - Eastbound Lane)

    9.55

    11.00

    Summer St (From Woodward St to William St will progressively open to westbound traffic as conyoy passes)

    9.55

    10.30

    Lords Place( From Summer to Byng)

    10.15

    11.15

    Byng St ( From Lords Place to Peisley St)

    10.15

    11.15

    Byng St (From Peisley to Seymour St)

    11.10

    11.25

    Seymour St ( From Byng to March St)

    11.10

    12.00

    There are a number of cross streets between Summer St and Byng St, where there will be traffic control barriers at both ends of the block. During the closure (approx 20 mins between 9.55 and 10.15) in these locations (Hamer, Sampson & Clinton Streets) residents will be able to leave that block by crossing Summer St.



  • Beetles' time to bug off

    about 1 month ago
    Elm 2

    16 January, 2018

    Orange’s Elm Trees are already reaping the benefits of treatment by Orange City Council tree crews to combat the spread of Elm Leaf Beetle.

    Orange’s Elm Trees were badly damaged this time last year after an unprecedented attack from the Elm Leaf Beetle.

    The swarms of beetles ate the trees’ leaves which would normally be green and full during Summer.

    The trees then shed most of their leaves, leaving piles of skeletonized leaves on the ground. The early loss of leaves impacts on the tree’s ability to produce ( through photosynthesis) its stores of energy to grow...


    16 January, 2018

    Orange’s Elm Trees are already reaping the benefits of treatment by Orange City Council tree crews to combat the spread of Elm Leaf Beetle.

    Orange’s Elm Trees were badly damaged this time last year after an unprecedented attack from the Elm Leaf Beetle.

    The swarms of beetles ate the trees’ leaves which would normally be green and full during Summer.

    The trees then shed most of their leaves, leaving piles of skeletonized leaves on the ground. The early loss of leaves impacts on the tree’s ability to produce ( through photosynthesis) its stores of energy to grow and resist disease.

    In August last year, Orange City Council’s Tree Crew treated about 260 trees, in streets and parks, with insecticide designed to kill the beetles once the insect had eaten the leaves.



    While there are already positive signs, Orange Mayor Reg Kidd, said the full impact of the treatment against the beetle won’t be fully realised until at least next year.

    “The beetles must ingest the poison to be affected by it, “he said.

    “This means they must still take a bite from the leaves, so people will still see leaves that have a shot hole appearance (adult beetle damage) or skeletonisation (eating away of the leaf surface between the veins by the larvae) about the place. The treatment works against both the adult beetle and larvae stages.

    “Already, residents are reporting far fewer damaged than last season. We’re already seeing an impact.
    “Long term, this treatment is interrupting the lifecycle of the beetle, which means by this time next year many of the beetles would have died before they had a chance to lay their eggs and we should see a much better result.

    “We can’t treat every single Elm Tree in the city so we won’t ever be rid of this pest but we can treat as many on council property as possible.

    Cr Kidd said residents should seek advice from a professional arborist about how best to treat their own trees.

    “It would be great if everyone in the city who has an Elm tree in their backyard could get some advice from a local arborist on how best to make sure their own tree stays healthy.

    “Let’s band together as a community and do as much as we can to help keep our Elms looking beautiful.”

    Council staff injected the trunks of about 60 street trees with insecticide last Spring, and treated a further 200 trees in local parks with tablets placed in the ground.

    The insecticide within the tablets, dissolves within the ground near the feeding roots of the tree and then the sap flow takes the insecticide up to the leaves.

    This technique works best in Spring as the tree starts to bud.

    Injections straight into the trunk work much faster, generally within 48 hours, however this method is more expensive.

    BEATLEMANIA: Mayor Reg Kidd with an Elm tree in Newman Park suffering damage from Elm Leaf beetles.

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  • Financial assistance for community groups up for grabs

    about 1 month ago
    Reg kidd no border 300
    Monday, January 15, 2018

    Orange City Council is calling on Orange community groups to put their hand up for a share of about $200,000 worth of financial assistance.

    Orange Mayor Reg Kidd said community groups and volunteer organisations were the back bone of our community and he was proud council had donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to worthy associations in the past.

    “These people are one of the reasons Orange is such a wonderful place to live,” Cr Kidd said.

    “Each year, council calls on these groups to put in an application for a share of the financial assistance...

    Monday, January 15, 2018

    Orange City Council is calling on Orange community groups to put their hand up for a share of about $200,000 worth of financial assistance.

    Orange Mayor Reg Kidd said community groups and volunteer organisations were the back bone of our community and he was proud council had donated hundreds of thousands of dollars to worthy associations in the past.

    “These people are one of the reasons Orange is such a wonderful place to live,” Cr Kidd said.

    “Each year, council calls on these groups to put in an application for a share of the financial assistance that is available.

    “We’d love to help everyone with every request but the reality is, we only have a certain amount we can donate. It is important groups fill in their applications soon so they have the best chance of getting over the line.

    “There are several categories in which groups can apply for assistance, for example it could be a rate waive, event sponsorship, hire fee reduction or a direct financial grant.

    “It is important groups get organised and get their applications in as soon as possible because some of the financial assistance is only available once a year.

    “Just because a group has received help in the past doesn’t mean the support will happen again automatically.

    “Groups need to reapply to let us know that help is still needed.”

    Information about which grants are available, how often applications are sought and how to apply can be found on Orange City Council’s website at www.orange.nsw.gov.au/grants

    As part of the application process, there is a focus on identifying the local benefit the event or project will bring to the Orange community.

    In some of the application forms, there is also a section for applicants to identify which local businesses they will use - so Council can try to track the broader benefit and impact of this program.

    “Being able to support local community groups is one of the best parts of being on council and I strongly encourage every one of Orange’s community organisations to put their hand up,” Cr Kidd said.


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  • New bike ramp beats bridge obstacle for cyclists

    about 1 month ago
    Bike ramp close up 300


    12 January 2018

    A new bike ramp on a local rail overpass pedestrian bridge is helping local cyclists turn an obstacle into an easy thoroughfare.

    Cr Stephen Nugent said the new ramp is the latest step in a long-term strategy by Orange City Council, aimed at making Orange a more bike-friendly city.

    "The Council’s Active Travel Plan has involved programs in schools, mapping, signage, paths, boardwalks, on-road markings and bike racks installed throughout the city," Stephen Nugent said. "And it's all with the aim of encouraging more people to ride or walk to school or work."

    "During some community consultations...


    12 January 2018

    A new bike ramp on a local rail overpass pedestrian bridge is helping local cyclists turn an obstacle into an easy thoroughfare.

    Cr Stephen Nugent said the new ramp is the latest step in a long-term strategy by Orange City Council, aimed at making Orange a more bike-friendly city.

    "The Council’s Active Travel Plan has involved programs in schools, mapping, signage, paths, boardwalks, on-road markings and bike racks installed throughout the city," Stephen Nugent said. "And it's all with the aim of encouraging more people to ride or walk to school or work."

    "During some community consultations about how cyclists are moving about the city, it became clear that locations like the pedestrian bridge over the railway line were a potential obstacle for riders.

    "Having to carry a bike up and over the bridge could be a barrier for some cyclists and one of the aims of the Active Travel Plan is to remove barriers to people choosing ‘active travel’ options."


    The ramps are a simple metal angle fixed to the side of the steps, powder-coated safety yellow so they are highly visible.

    Bike riders simply wheel their bike at an angle into the ramp, and the push their bike up and over the bridge. The design aimed to keep the ramp as small and simple as possible to have minimal impact on the bridge appearance and use.

    The project cost approximately $5,000. This work is happening in partnership with the NSW Government, through the RMS, under the ‘Cycling Towns’ program.

    Because the new feature was being attached to a rail bridge, the project needed to be approved by Transport for NSW and state Heritage authorities.

    The original timber posts on the western end of the bridge were restored as part of the work.

    RAMP : Orange cyclist Hayley Barrett tries out the new ramp, built on the rail pedestrian bridge next to the railway station.