Why will the new pipelines be built?

Building the new pipelines will improve water access and water security in the areas serviced by Orange City Council , Cabonne Council and Central Tablelands Water.

There are two components to the overall scheme :

Project 1 ... The northern pipeline : a 16km raw water pipeline from Orange to Molong Dam, and a 49km potable water pipeline from Molong to Cumnock and Yeoval.

This project will deliver improved water security to Cabonne residents and a reticulated potable water to the villages of Cumnock and Yeoval. 


Project 2 ... The southern Pipeline : 57 km potable pipeline from Orange to Carcoar via Spring Hill, Millthorpe and Blayney.

This project will deliver improved, more secure supply of water to the current customers of Central Tablelands Water, as well as catering for future growth. 

Orange City Council will gain access to emergency water in the case of a catastrophic system failure such as a fire at the water filtration plant and also be able to ensure water quantity and quality to the Airport and Spring Hill/Lucknow.

The southern leg of the project will deliver an improved secure yield to the customers of Central Tablelands Water catering for future growth. 

Orange City Council will gain access to emergency water in the case of a catastrophic system failure such as a fire at the water filtration plant and also be able to ensure water quantity and quality to the Airport and Spring Hill/Lucknow.


How long will it take to build the new pipelines?

The pipelines are relatively straightforward infrastructure projects that can be project-managed by local councils, and will provide benefits to the regional construction industry.

Including the planning process, it is expected that the pipelines can be built over a period of three years, and will provide immediate benefits once completed.

It is expected that the pipelines could be completed by May 2017.

What will the pipelines looks like? Will it affect private land?

The pipelines will be installed underground. Experience shows that once the route of the pipeline has been rehabilitated, the path of the pipelines will not readily obvious.

It is proposed that the pipelines will mostly be able to be built alongside roads and within existing road reserves.

The detailed route of the pipeline will need to closely consider potential impacts on other underground services, environmental impacts, property access and other infrastructure such as roads.

Where it is not practical to construct the pipelines inside road reserves, the pipeline will need to pass through privately-owned land.

Private landholders will be consulted about factors such as :

  • the detailed route of the pipeline, 
  • potential disturbance to farming activity, 
  • the impact of the construction phase and 
  • the rehabilitation process.